The Joy of Prefetch

If you heard me speak at YAPC or you’ve had any kind of conversation with me over the last few weeks then it’s likely you’ve heard me mention the secret project that I’ve been writing for my wife’s school.

To give you a bit of background, there’s one afternoon a week where the students at the school don’t follow the normal academic timetable. On that afternoon, the teachers all offer classes on wider topics. This year’s topics include Acting, Money Management and Quilt-Making. It’s a wide-ranging selection. Each student chooses one class per term.

This year I offered to write a web app that allowed the students to make their selections. This seemed better than the spreadsheet-based mechanisms that have been used in the past. Each student registers with their school-based email address and then on a given date, they can log in and make their selections.

I wrote the app in Dancer2 (my web framework of choice) and the site started allowing students to make their selections last Thursday morning. In the run-up to the go-live time, Google Analytics showed me that about 180 students were on the site waiting to make their selections. At 7am the selections part of the site went live.

And immediately stopped working. Much to my embarrassment.

It turned out that a disk failed on the server moments after the site went live. It’s the kind of thing that you can’t predict.But it leads to lots of frustrated teenagers and doesn’t give a very good impression.

To give me time to rebuild and stress-test the site we’ve decided to relaunch at 8pm this evening. I’ve spent the weekend rebuilding the app on a new (and more powerful) server.

I’m pretty sure that the timing of the failure was coincidental. I don’t think that my app caused the disk failure. But a failure of this magnitude makes you paranoid, so I spent a lot of yesterday tuning the code.

The area I looked at most closely was the number of database queries that the app was making. There are two main actions that might be slow – the page that builds the list of courses that a student can choose from and the page which saves a student’s selections.

I started with the first of these. I set DBIC_TRACE to 1 and fired up a development copy of the app. I was shocked to see the app run about 120 queries – many of which were identical.

Of course I should have tested this before. And, yes, it’s an idiotic way to build an application. But I’m afraid that using an ORM like DBIx::Class can make it all too easy to write code like this. Fortunately, it makes it easy to fix it too. The secret is “prefetch”.

“Prefetch” is an option you can pass to the the “search” method on a resultset. Here’s an example of the difference that can make.

There are seven year groups in a British secondary school. Most schools call them Year 7 to Year 13 (the earlier years are in primary school). Each year group will have a number of forms. So there’s a one to many relationship between years and forms. In database terms, the form table holds a foreign key to the year table. In DBIC terms, the Year result class has a “has_many” relationship with the Form result class and the Form result class has a “belongs_to” relation with the Year result class.

A naive way to list the years and their associated forms would look like this:

Run code like that with DBIC_TRACE turned on and you’ll see the proliferation of database queries. There’s one query that selects all of the years and then for each year, you get another query to get all of its associated forms.

Of course, if you were writing raw SQL, you wouldn’t do that. You’d write one query that joins the year and form tables and pulls all of the data back at once. And the “prefetch” option gives you a way to do that in DBIC as well.

All we have done here is to interpose a call to “search” which adds the “prefetch” option. If you run this code with DBIC_TRACE turned on, then you’ll see that there’s only one database query and it’ll be very similar to the raw SQL that you would have written – it brings back the data from both of the tables at the same time.

But that’s not all of the cleverness of the “prefetch” option. You might be wondering what the difference is between “prefetch” and the rather similar-sounding “join” option. Well, with “join” the columns from the joined table would be added to your main table’s result set. This would, for example, create some kind of mutant Year resultset object that you could ask for Form data using calls like “get_column(‘forms.name’)”. [Update: I was trying to simplify this explanation and I ended up over-simplifying to the point of complete inaccuracy – joined columns only get added to your result set if you use the “columns” or “select/as” attributes. And the argument to “get_column()” needs to be the column name that you have defined using those options.] And that’s useful sometimes, but often I find it easier to use “prefetch” as that uses the data from the form table to build Form result objects which look exactly as they would if you pulled them directly from the database.

So that’s the kind of change that I made in my code. By prefetching a lot of associated tables I was able to drastically cut down the number of queries made to build that course selection page. Originally, it was about 120 queries. I got it down to three. Of course, each of those queries is a lot larger and is doing far more work. But there’s a lot less time spent compiling SQL and pulling data from the database.

The other page I looked at – the one that saves a student’s selections – wasn’t quite so impressive. Originally it was about twenty queries and I got it down to six.

Reducing the number of database queries is a really useful way to make your applications more efficient and DBIC’s “prefetch” option is a great tool for enabling that. I recommend that you take a close look at it.

After crowing about my success on Twitter I got a reply from a colleague pointing me at Test::DBIC::ExpectedQueries which looks like a great tool for monitoring the number of queries in your app.

Leave a Reply