Beginners Perl Tutorial

A few weeks ago I got an interesting email from someone at Udemy. They were looking for someone to write a beginners Perl tutorial that they would make available for free on their web site. I think I wasn’t the only person that they got in touch with but, after a brief email conversation, they asked me to go ahead and write it.

It turned out to be harder that I thought it would be. I expected that I could write about 6,000 words over a weekend. In the end it took two weekends and it stretched to over 8,000 words. The problem is not in the writing, it’s in deciding what to omit. I’m sure that if you read it you’ll find absolutely essential topics that I haven’t included – but I wonder what you would have dropped to make room for them.

But eventually I finished it, delivered it to them (along with an invoice – hurrah!) and waited to hear that they had published it.

Yesterday I heard that it was online. Not from Udemy (they had forgotten to tell me that it was published two weeks ago) but from a friend.

Unfortunately, some gremlins had crept in at some point during their publication pipeline. Some weird character substitutions had taken place (which had disastrous consequences for some of the Perl code examples) and a large number of paragraph breaks had vanished. But I reported those all to Udemy yesterday and I see they have all been fixed overnight.

So finally I can share the tutorial with you. Please feel free to share it with people who might find it useful.

Although it’s 8,000 words long, it really only scratches the surface of the language. Udemy have added a link to one of their existing Perl courses, but unfortunately it’s not a very good Perl course (Udemy don’t seem to have any very good Perl courses). I understand why they have done that (that is, after all, the whole point of commissioning this tutorial – to drive more people to pay for Perl courses on tutorial) but it’s a shame that there isn’t anything of higher quality available.

So there’s an obvious hole in Udemy’s offerings. They don’t have a high quality Perl course. That might be a hole that I try to fill when I next get some free time.

Unless any other Perl trainers want to beat me to it.

Oh, and please let me know what you think of the tutorial.

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Yet More Modern Perl in Linux Format

Over the weekend the postman bought me my subscribption copy of Linux Format issue 155. This contains the third (and final) part of my Modern Perl tutorial. In this part we’re adding features to the Dancer web application that we started in issue 153.

This series has concentrated on web applications (with Dancer) and database access (with DBIx::Class). I’ve already got provisional agreement for another short series later in the year – where I plan to cover OO programming using Moose.

The new issue will be in the shops later this week.

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Public Training Courses in February

I’ll be running some public training courses in London in February. There will be two two-day courses (which include practical sessions). The intermediate course will be on Feb 21/22 and the advanced course will be running on Feb 23/24. The courses will be held at the Imperial Hotel in Russell Square.

For more details (including the syllabus and prices) please see my training page.

There are plenty of unfilled Perl jobs in London currently. I’m constantly getting recruiters phoning or emailing me asking for help finding suitable candidates. If you’ve done a bit of Perl in the past, but left it for other technologies, now would be a good time to rekindle your interest and these would be good courses to take (but, of course, I would say that, wouldn’t I!)

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More Modern Perl in Linux Format

Yesterday’s post bought my subscription copy of Linux Format issue 153. This issue contains the second article in my short series about Modern Perl. In this article we take the simple DBIx::Class application that we wrote last time and put a web front end on it using Dancer.

Over the next few days I’ll be writing the third (and final) article in the series. This will involve adding more features to the web app.

If the series is successful (and please let LXF know if you liked it) then perhaps I’ll be asked back to write more next year.

LXF 153 should be appearing in all good newsagents next week.

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Perl Tutorial

Google Reader just showed me Mithaldu’s blog post about the falling level of Google searches for the term “perl tutorial“. The fall is, of course, more than a little worrying and we should do what we can to get more people searching for Perl. But I wondered what results Google is currently returning for this search. It’s not a pretty sight.

  • The first two results are for Nik Silver’s Perl tutorial from about twenty years ago. I know Nik and I know that he would be horrified to think that people were trying to learn Perl from this site. Nik has been responsible and left a clear notice at the top of the page stating how out of date it is and I understand him wanting to leave the page there for historical interest. But I still see questions on places like Stack Overflow from people who are obviously using this tutorial.
  • The next link is to a site at That sounds encouraging, but it’s a rather pedestrian affair teaching dated and simplistic Perl and written by someone whose first language clearly isn’t English.
  • The next result is to It’s about as good as you’d expect from a site that insists on calling the language “PERL”.
  • Next, we finally get to something worth using. It’s a link to the free online version of Simon Cozens’ book Beginning Perl. That’s good – but it’s still a little dated.
  • Next we get to Robert’s Perl Tutorial. Which proudly boasts it was last updated on 20th April 1999. That’ll be up to date then.
  • The next result is BradleyKuhn’s book Picking Up Perl. This was an attempt to produce an open source Perl tutorial book. It was a worthwhile project, but it was last updated in 2002.
  • The next result is one that finally links to It’s an article by Doug Sheppard called Beginner’s Introduction to Perl. I bet it was great when it was first published in October 2000.
  • Towards the bottom of the list there are two links to Gabor’s recent (current?) Perl tutorial series. These are probably the only links on the list that we should be sharing with people wanting to learn Perl.
  • Finally, there’s the NCSA Perl Tutorial. At least this page has realised that it is out of date and has closed down. Unfortunately the alternative sites that it suggests are of variable quality.

So there it is. The first page of results is of rather variable quality. There’s some great stuff there, some good but dated stuff and some dreadful stuff. But I’m sure there are better Perl tutorials out there. It would be great if the first link returned by Google was to But what other sites should be on the list? What good Perl tutorial resources do you know of?

Have I just given all those dreadful sites a healthy boost of Googlejuice by linking to them?

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