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London Perl Workshop 2018

Last Saturday was the London Perl Workshop and (as has become traditional), I’m going to tell you how much fun it was so that you feel jealous that you missed it and make more of an effort to come along next year.

This year was slightly different for me. For various reasons, I didn’t have the time to propose and prepare any talks for the workshop so (for the first time ever) I decided I’d just go to the workshop and not give any talks. It very nearly worked too.

I arrived at about 9am, checked in at the registration desk and collected my free t-shirt. Then I went upstairs to the main lecture theatre to see Julian giving the organisers’ welcome talk. Julian is a new member of the organising committee, having only moved to London in the last year. But he’s certainly thrown himself into the community.

Following the welcome talk, I stayed in the main room to hear Léon Brocard explaining what’s new in the world of HTTP. It seems the HTTP3 is just around the corner and while it’s a lot more complicated than previous versions it has the potential to make the web a lot faster. I stayed in the same room to hear Martin Berends talking about Cucumber. I’ve been meaning to look at Cucumber in more detail for some years – perhaps this talk will be the prod I need.

Things were running a little late in the main room by this point, so I was a little late getting to Simon Proctor‘s 24 uses for Perl6‎. I try to get to at least one Perl 6 talk at every conference I go to. And this time, I was galvanised enough to buy a copy of Learning Perl 6 for my Kindle.

I caught up with a few friends over the coffee break and then headed back to the main room to see Saif Ahmed explaining Quick and Dirty GUI Applications (and why you should make them)‎. This was nostalgic for me. Almost twenty years ago at an OSCON in California, I remember a long, drunken night when some of us sketched out a plan to build a framework-agnostic GUI toolkit for Perl (like a DBI for GUIs). I think we gave up when we realised we would need to call it “PUI”. Anyway, it seems that Saif (who was keen to make it very clear that he’s not a professional programmer) has written such a tool.

After that I went to see my former colleague Andrew Solomon talking about ‎HOWTO: grow the Perl team. The talk was based around his experiences helping various companies training up Perl programmers using his Geek Uni site.

And then it was lunchtime. I met up with a few other former London Perl Mongers leaders and we had some very nice pizzas just over the road from the workshop venue. Over lunch, we claimed to be preparing for our afternoon panel discussion – but really we were mainly just reminiscing.

After lunch, it was back to the main room to see Peter Allan’s talk on Security Checks using perlcritic and Tom Hukins on Contrarian Perl‎. Both talks were the kind of thing that really makes you think. Peter’s talk introduced some interesting ideas about pushing perlcritic further than it is usually pushed. And Tom pointed out that in order to write the best code possible, you might need to move beyond the generally accepted “industry standards”.

After that, there was a brief visit to a different room to hear Mohammed Anwar talking about The power of mentoring‎. Mohammed is another recent newcomer to the Perl community and, like Julien, he is certainly making a difference.

I skipped the coffee break and went back to the main room to prepare for the one session that I had been roped into contributing to – ‎”I’m a Former London.PM Leader – Ask Me Anything”‎. We had gathered together as many of the former London Perl Mongers leaders and we took questions from the audience about the past, present and future of the group. I was slightly worried that it might tip over into nostalgic self-indulgence, but several people later told me that they had really enjoyed it.

Then it was time for the lightning talks (which were as varied and entertaining as always) and Julien’s “thank-you” talk. Like last year, the post-conference started in the venue before moving on to a pub. I stayed for an hour or so, chatting to friends, before making my way home.

As always, I’d like to thank all of the organisers, speakers, sponsors and attendees for making the workshop as successful as it (always!) is.

Here’s a list of those sponsors. They’re nice companies:

Hope to see you at next years workshop.

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London Perl Workshop Report

(Photo above by Chris Jack)

Last Saturday was the annual London Perl Workshop. I should write up what happened before I forget it all.

I arrived at about 8:30 in the morning and was able to check in quickly – collecting a bit of swag which included a free t-shirt as I was a speaker. I then made my way up to the main lecture theatre in order to see Katherine Spice welcoming people to the day on behalf of the new team of organisers. After that headed off to the smaller lecture theatre to set up for my tutorial. There were a few differences from previous years. Firstly, I was giving a completely Perl-free tutorial (about on-page SEO techniques) and secondly, I had been moved out of the tutorial track and into one of the main talk tracks. As a side effect of that second change, I was also asked to trim my talk from my usual two hours to a more “talk-like” eighty minutes.

The talk seemed to go well. I got some interesting questions and a few people came up to me later in the day to tell me they had found it interesting useful (sometimes both!) The slides to the talk are available on SlideShare: Web Site Tune-Up – Improve Your Googlejuice.

Following that, I had time to see one talk before the coffee break and I chose Why learning a bit of Crypto is good for you‎ by Colin Newell. Colin gave a good (if, necessarily rather shallow) explanation of how learning a small amount of cryptography can help you improve the security of your systems.

Then it was was the morning coffee break. For the past few years, this break has traditionally included cakes which were supplied by a sponsor. When that didn’t look like happening this year, organiser Neil Bowers (with a gentle nudge from Leon Timmermans) came up with the idea of a community bake. And that’s what happened. A number of attendees baked cakes for us all. I had one of Neil’s blueberry muffins and it was lovely.

There was a slight change in the schedule after the coffee break. Matt Trout was unable to be at the workshop so, at the last minute, JJ Allen stepped in and gave his talk To delete or not to delete, that is the question‎, which was about some impending data protection laws which will affect all businesses. I stayed in the same room to see Neil Bowers explain The PAUSE Operating Model‎ and then JJ returned to talk about something completely different – Perl and Docker, sitting in a tree‎.  JJ’s company, Opus VL, have released some of their Docker infrastructure code to CPAN and I’m sure many people will find it useful.

Then it was lunchtime. I bought a sandwich from the university’s cafe and sat in the foyer talking to various friends who walked past.

I started the afternoon watching Paul Evans on ‎Devel::MAT updated‎. Devel::MAT is a development tool which aims to do for memory analysis what Devel::NYTProf does for profiling. It looks very useful. That was followed by Julien Fieggehenn’s talk Turning humans into developers with Perl‎. Julien doesn’t just train people in Perl, he acts as a mentor for them for a couple of months when they join his company, so he was able to talk in some detail about much wider issues than just choosing which topics to cover in a training course.

Talking about wider issues, I then saw Tom Hukins’ talk Development: More than Writing Code?‎ Tom is, of course, right that there’s more to being a good developer than just writing good code. This is a topic that I’m thinking of developing a training course on. Tom was followed by Paul Johnson giving good advice on Modernising A Legacy Perl Application.

The afternoon coffee break included some professionally baked pastries. They were also lovely, but don’t think they were appreciated quite as much as the morning’s community versions.

After the coffee break, we all gathered in the main lecture theatre for the plenary session. Ann Barcomb spoke about Fifteen Years of Contributing Casually‎. Ann was once a Perl developer. I first met her at the first YAPC::Europe in London in 2000 and she was then part of the organising team for the second YAPC::Europe in Amsterdam in 2001. But since then she has become a researcher into the sociology of the open source movement. You can read a lot of her research on her web site. Her talk illustrated her findings with some personal anecdotes about her own casual contributions to the Perl community. Everyone seemed to find it fascinating and the Q&A at the end of the talk showed every signs of turning into a full-scale discussion. On a personal level, it was great to catch up with Ann again about fifteen years after we had been in the same room together.

And then there were the lightning talks. They were their usual mixture of intriguing and entertaining. Mark Keating (enjoying his first LPW that he wasn’t organising) implored us to get involved in the Enlightened Perl Organisation. I announced a plan to publish more Perl books (of which, more later). I was particularly impressed by Kenichi Ishigaki who flew in from Japan just to give a lightning talk about his module Perl::PrereqScanner::NotQuiteLite.

After that, there were a few closing words from Neil Bowers and, in another innovation brought in by the new organisers, drinks were served on site rather than in a local pub. Of course, some people went off to a local pub after that as well.

As always, it was a great day. The new organising team seem to have hit the ground running and produced an impressive workshop. My thanks to the organisers, the volunteers, the speakers, the sponsors and all of the attendees.

I’m already looking forward to next year’s workshop.

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London Perl Workshop Klaxon

The London Perl Workshop is looking frighteningly imminent. It’s on November 25th – that’s less than three weeks away. All across the capital (and even further afield) if you listen hard you will hear the sounds of speakers frantically trying to get their talks ready.

That, at least, is how I have spent my weekend. I’m presenting a new training course at the workshop and I’ve been working hard on the slides for the last couple of days.

This new course is a bit of an experiment for me. It’s a completely Perl-free session. For most of this year, I’ve been working for a well-known property portal and the work I’ve been doing for them has concentrated on search engine optimisation and I’m going to take this opportunity to share some of my new-found knowledge with a room full of people.

I know what you’re thinking. SEO is either a) really dull keyword research or b) snake-oil. To be fair, I’ve seen both of those things, but that’s not what I’m going to be covering. I’d hate to be seen as either boring or a snake-oil salesman!

No, I’m going to be covering something that I think is far more interesting. The course will be all about making your web site more attractive to Google. And if Google likes your web site, they will crawl your site more often, extract more useful information from it and (hopefully) show your site in response to more user search queries. Getting your site to appear in more search results means more visitors and more visitors means a more successful web site.

I won’t be covering anything complicated. There’s nothing that you won’t be able to implement in a couple of hours. Anyone could use these techniques – but the point is that most people don’t. That’s why they work.

The schedule hasn’t been published yet, so I don’t know when I’ll be giving the talk, but I expect to have that information in the next few days. I do know that my slot is 80 minutes – that’s because the organisers have received a large number of high-quality proposals, so we all have to squeeze up a bit to fit in as many of them as possible.

The London Perl Workshop is one of my favourite conferences. The range of talks is always great. And it seems that this year’s workshop (which has a new organising team) is going to be no exception.

Hope to see some of you on 25th November.

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London Perl Workshop Review

(Photo by Mark Keating)

Last Saturday was the annual London Perl Workshop. And, as always, it was a great opportunity to soak up the generosity, good humour and all-round-awesomeness of the European Perl community. I say “European” as the LPW doesn’t just get visitors from London or the UK. There are many people who attend regularly from all over Europe. And, actually, from further afield – there are usually two or three Americans there.

I arrived at about twenty to nine, which gave me just enough time to register and say hello to a couple of people before heading to the main room for Mark Keating’s welcome. Mark hinted that with next year’s workshop being the tenth that he will have organised, he is starting to wonder if it’s time for someone else to take over. More on that later.

I then had a quick dash back down to the basement where I was running a course on Modern Web Development with Perl. It seemed to go well, people seemed engaged and asked some interesting questions. Oh, and my timing was spot on to let my class out two minutes early so that they were at the front of the queue for the free cakes (courtesy of Exonetric). That’s just my little trick for getting slightly higher marks in the feedback survey.

After the coffee break I was in the smaller lecture theatre for three interesting talks – Neil Bowers on Boosting community engagement with CPAN‎ (and, yes, I’ve finally got round to signing up for the CPAN Pull Request Challenge), Smylers on Code Interface Mistakes to Avoid‎ and Neil Bowers (again) on ‎Dependencies and the River of CPAN‎ which was an interesting discussion on how the way you maintain a CPAN module should change as it becomes more important to more people.

Then it was lunch, which I spent in the University cafeteria catching up with friends.

After lunch, I saw Léon Brocard on Making your website seem faster, followed by Steve’s Man Publishing Pint, which turned out to be about publishing ebooks to Amazon easily – something which I’ve been very interested in recently.

The schedule was in a bit of a state of flux, so I missed Andrew Solomon’s talk on How to grow a Perl team‎ and instead saw Steve Mynott talking about Perl 6 Grammars. Following that, I gave my talk on Conference Driven Publishing (which is part apology for not writing the book I promised to write at the last LPW and part attempt to get more people writing and publishing ebooks about Perl).

Then there was another coffee break which I spent getting all the latest gossip from some former colleagues. We got so caught up in it that I was slightly late for Theo van Hoesel’s talk Dancer2 REST assured. I like Theo’s ideas but (as I’ve told him face to face) I would like to see a far simpler interface.

Next up was the keynote. Liz Mattijsen stood in for Jonathan Worthington (who had to cancel at the last minute) and she explained the history of her involvement in Perl and how she was drawn to working on Perl 6. She finished with a brief overview of some interesting Perl 6 features.

Then there were the lightning talks which were their usual mixture of useful, thought-provoking and insane.

Mark Keating closed the conference by thanking everyone for their work, their sponsorship and their attendance. He returned to the theme of perhaps passing on the organisation of the workshop to someone new. No-one, I think, can fail to be incredibly grateful for the effort that Mark has put into organising the last nine workshops and it makes complete sense to me that he can’t maintain that level of effort forever. So it makes sense to start looking for someone else to take over organising the workshop in the future. And, given the complexity of the task, it would be sensible if that person got involved as soon as possible so that we could have a smooth transition during the organisation of next year’s event.

If you’re interested in becoming a major hero to the European Perl community, then please get in touch with Mark.

There was no planned post-workshop event this year. So we broke up into smaller groups and probably colonised most of central London. Personally, I gathered a few friends and wandered off to my favourite restaurant in Chinatown.

I can only repeat what Mark said as he closed the workshop and give my thanks to all of the organisers, volunteers, speakers, sponsors and attendees. There’s little doubt in my mind that the LPW is, year after year, one of the best grass-roots-organised events in the European geek calendar. And this year’s was as good as any.

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London Perl Workshop 2015

This time next week we will all be enjoying the London Perl Workshop. I thought it was worth looking at what the day has in store.

As always (well, except that one time when they had no power) the LPW will take place at the Cavendish Campus of the University of Westminster. I’m told there are exams or something like that taking place on the same day, so it’s important to follow the signs when you get there or you might end up in the wrong place being forced to take an exam.

The workshop starts at 9am, but registration queues can be quite long, so I’d recommend getting there half an hour or so earlier than that. If you get lucky and register quickly, then why not look for an organiser and volunteer to help out for a while.

You’ll want to be in the main room for the welcome address at 9am – just in case there’s any important news about the day. But the talks start at 9:10.

My ‎Modern Perl Web Development‎ course starts then. Hopefully it will be in my usual classroom. Alteratively, Andrew Solomon’s Crash course on Perl, the Universe and Everything‎ starts at the same time and goes on much longer. Or you might want to see some shorter courses. If I wasn’t running my training, I’d want to see Tom Hukins talking about ‎Escaping Insanity‎ and Rick Deller on Developing Your Brand – from a job seeker , Business to sole contractor/consultant‎ – he assures me that his slides are no longer the shocking pink he has used in previous years.

At 11:00 there’s a coffee break sponsored by Evozon. My training finishes at that point, so I’m free to see a few talks. Unfortunately, I want to see all of the talks in the next slot. I suspect I’ll end up seeing Neil Bowers’ Boosting community engagement with CPAN‎ and Smylers’ ‎Don’t Do That: Code Interface Mistakes to Avoid‎, but I could well be tempted into Aaron Crane’s Write-once data: writing Perl like Haskell‎ instead. Or, back on the workshop track, there’s Dominic Humphries on From can to can’t: An intro to functional programming. Just before lunch, I think I’ll see Neil Bowers again. This time he’s talking about Dependencies and the River of CPAN.

After lunch there’s another session where I want to see everything. I’d love to see Stevan Little talking about his latest iteration of the p5-mop, but I suspect I’ll end up seeing Leon Brocard on Making your website seem faster‎ followed by Kaitlyn Parkhurst on Project Management For The Solo Developer. Dominic’s functional programming workshop continues after lunch and is joined by John Davies and Martin Berends talking about Parallel Processing Performed Properly in Perl on Pi‎.

The big talk after the next short break is going to be Matt Trout on A decade of dubious decisions‎ but it’s another I’ll miss as I’m talking about Conference Driven Publishing‎ in another room during the second half of it. During the first half I’d recommend Steve Mynott’s Perl 6 Grammars‎.  But, I saw him practice it at a recent London Perl Mongers technical meeting, so I’ll be seeing Andrew Solomon explaining How to grow a Perl team‎. In the workshop stream, Christian Jaeger will be covering Functional Programming on Perl‎.

Then there’s another coffee break (this time sponsored by Perl Careers) and then we’re into the last few sessions. In the first you have a choice between Jeff Goff on From Regular Expressions to Parsing JavaScript: Learn Perl6 Grammars‎ and Theo van Hoesel on ‎Dancer2 REST assured‎. I think I’ll be in Theo’s talk.

These are followed by Jonathan Worthington’s keynote – The end of the beginning‎ and the lightning talks. It will, no doubt, be a great end to a fabulous day.

The London Perl Workshop is always a great day a learning about Perl and catching up with old friends. And because of the brilliant sponsors, it doesn’t cost the attendees a penny.

If you’re going to be near London next weekend and you have any interest in Perl, then why not register and come along?

Here’s a brief video of last year’s workshop.