Tag Archives: rpm

CPAN RPMs

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that I have an interest in packaging CPAN modules as RPMs for Linux distributions based on Red Hat.

For a few years, I’ve been (infrequently) building spreadsheets which list the various modules that are available as RPMs from the better know repositories (and my own small repository). Over the weekend, I thought that those spreadsheets might be more useful if they were turned into web pages. So that’s what I did.

You can see the lists for Fedora and Centos. Over the next few days, I plan to set up cron jobs so that they are rebuilt daily.

Please let me know if you find these lists useful.

A Cautionary Tale

I can never remember exactly how Time::Piece works. But that’s ok because I have documentation.

$ perldoc Time::Piece
No documentation found for "Time::Piece".

Huh?

$perl -v
This is perl 5, version 14, subversion 2 (v5.14.2) built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi
...

$ corelist Time::Piece
Time::Piece was first released with perl v5.9.5

$ perl -MTime::Piece -E'say $Time::Piece::VERSION'
Can't locate Time/Piece.pm in @INC (@INC contains: /usr/local/lib64/perl5 /usr/local/share/perl5 /usr/lib64/perl5/vendor_perl /usr/share/perl5/vendor_perl /usr/lib64/perl5 /usr/share/perl5 .).
BEGIN failed--compilation aborted.

So Time::Piece has been in the Perl core since 5.9.5. I’m running Perl 5.14.2 but I don’t have Time::Piece installed.

After ten minutes or so of head-scratching it came to me.

$ sudo yum install perl-core
Loaded plugins: langpacks, local, presto, refresh-packagekit
[ stuff snipped ]
---> Package perl-Time-Piece.x86_64 0:1.20.1-212.fc17 will be installed
[ more stuff snipped]

I’m running Fedora. The Fedora packagers have decided that they don’t need to install the whole standard Perl distribution as part of their standard installation. I don’t have a problem with that. I do have a problem with their naming conventions.

The minimal Perl installation that they include by default is in an RPM called “perl”. The full RPM that includes everything that a Perl developer would expect to see is called “perl-core”. Surely it’s obvious that those names are the wrong way round?

Isn’t there some way that the Perl 5 Porters can object to  this renaming of Perl?

I know I should be installing my own Perl with perlbrew. But I generally find that the system Perl works for everything that I need. There’s just this one thing that is guaranteed to trip me up every time I work on a new Fedora installation.

This is a public service blog post. Perhaps someone will come across it and be saved a couple of hours of confusion.

Fedora and Centos CPAN RPMs

Today I’ve updated my spreadsheets of the CPAN modules that are available as RPMs from various repositories for Fedora and Centos. I see that in many cases the “official” repos are now more up to date than my own repo (which I originally set up because the official repos are sometimes out of date).

This is all a precursor to doing a lot more work on my repo. I need to know which RPMs are being kept up to date by other people so that I can ignore those modules.

But I thought that other people might find the data useful or interesting.

More RPM Stuff

It’s been a while since I wrote anything here. if anyone is keeping score I’ve probably failed the Iron Man challenge of posting something every ten days.

Don’t have much to add here either but I thought some of you might be interested in a quick tweak I made to my spreadsheet of CPAN RPMs available for Fedora. It now lists all of the RPMs available across all of the repositories that I use and shows you which version of the module is available. I’ve also added the current CPAN version for all of these modules.

This gives me the information I need to do a few things that I’ve wanted to do for a while. In particular I should be able to script the automatic removal of RPMs from my repository when the official Fedora repository catches up with the version I’m carrying. I can also easily identify CPAN modules where the latest Fedora version (from any of the repositories) is lagging behind the CPAN version.

As always, the code is available on Github and patches are very welcome.

Update: And here’s another spreadsheet covering CPAN RPMs available for Centos.

META.yml and Building RPMs

An email has flooded in. It was in response to my piece about Building RPMs from CPAN Distributions and it was from Andreas Koenig. Andreas runs PAUSE, which is the service CPAN authors use to upload stuff to CPAN, so he knows what he’s talking about when it comes to CPAN (and many other matters). He says this:

It’s not correct that the META.yml contains the exact list of dependencies. The META.yml is not the authoritative source for them. The reason behind is that dependencies do differ across architectures. Exceptions to this rule may declare dynamic_config=0. In order to obtain the real list of dependencies you must run your Makefile.PL or Build.PL. Recent Module::Build provides a MYMETA.yml after Build.PL has run. You could use that instead. MakeMaker always had the dependency as a comment in the Makefile.

He is, of course, right. My previous article skipped blithely over some of the more gnarly corners of this problem. I should point out that Gabor and I discussed some of these over the weekend but it’s almost certainly worthwhile going into a little more detail.

It’s true that a static META.yml file can’t deal with all of the possibilities. Here are a number of examples of areas that need to be looked at in more detail.

Environmental differences
This is the area that Andreas is talking about. And the Padre problem I mentioned on Monday is one example of this. Padre runs on several different platforms. And some dependencies will only be required on certain platforms. For example the Win32::API module is only required if the module is being installed on Windows.

But it’s not just different operating systems or architectures that cause problems like this. If you’re trying to use Plack on a server with Apache 2 installed, you’ll need Apache2::Request. If your server has Apache 1 installed you’ll need Apache::Request. In each case, you won’t need the request module for the Apache version that you aren’t using. As things stand, the META.yml for Plack doesn’t list either of the Apache request modules, but a more intelligent system could work out which one of them is required and add that one to the list of dependencies.

“Choose One” requirements
Some modules exist simply as a way of allowing the user to choose between one of a number of implementations of a feature. A good example is JSON::Any. There are (at least) three different JSON modules on CPAN – JSON, JSON::DWIW and JSON::XS). Different systems will have different ones installed. JSON::Any allows a program to use any JSON module and not care which of them is installed. But how do you model that dependency? If you make any (or all) of the supported modules a required dependency, you rather miss the whole point of the module. JSON::Any’s META.yml ignores the problem and leaves it to the Makefile.PL to work out what to do. The Fedora RPM for this module takes a weird approach and makes JSON::XS a required dependency. Even if META.yml could support this mode of working, RPM doesn’t have this feature.

Added features
Some modules have optional requirements. That is, if certain other modules are installed then the module gains more features. One example is the Template-XML distribution. Template-XML contain a plugin (Template::Plugin::XML) for the Template Toolkit. Template::Plugin::XML is a wrapper around a number of XML processing modules. If a particular module (for example, XML::DOM) is installed then Template::Plugin::XML allows the user to uses XML::DOM for XML processing. It works similarly for XML::LibXML, XML::Parser, XML::RSS, XML::Simple and XML::XPath. None of them are required, different functionality is turned on for each one that is installed. You don’t have to configure Template::Plugin::XML at all to work with these modules. It just works if a particular module is installed. If, at a later date, you remove that module then Template::Plugin::XML removes the features supported by that module.

This seems to be somewhere where I have philosophical differences with the Fedora RPM packaging team. I believe that all of these modules should be seen as optional and there for shouldn’t be listed as dependencies in the META.yml or the RPM. The Fedora team disagrees. They want each RPM to depend on all of the modules it needs in order to have as many features as possible, The Template-XML RPM therefore requires all of the XML processing modules I listed above. That seems wrong to me.

META.yml supports the concept of  “recommended modules”. I think that these optional modules should be listed there. But I don’t believe that RPM has a similar feature.

So there are a few problems that I see with the META.yml approach. In the face of these issues I should probably back down slightly from my previous position that META.yml is the definitive way to get a list of dependencies. What I now believe is that parsing META.yml will give you a better position to start from than parsing the Perl code and extracting all of the “use” statements.

But I hadn’t previously heard of the MYMETA.yml that Andreas mentioned in his email. That’s certainly a way to get round the environmental differences I listed above. I don’t think it solves the other two issues though.

Are there any other corner cases that I’ve missed. Does anyone else have any opinions on building RPMs from CPAN distributions?

Useful RPM Stuff

I forgot to mention this yesterday. I’ve set up a github project (see http://github.com/davorg/rpm_stuff) where I’ll dump bits and pieces that I’m writing to make my RPM-building life easier.

The first utility I’ve uploaded there is called can_rpmbuild. You pass it an RPM spec file and it tells you which of the dependencies are available from the RPM repositories that you use and which of them you’ll have build yourself.

I’m sure it can be improved. Patches welcome of course. And please let me know if you find it useful.

Building RPMs from CPAN Distributions

Regular readers will know that in the past I’ve shown some interest in building RPMs from CPAN distributions. It’s been a while since I did much work in this area (although I do still release the occasional module to my RPM repository.

Over the weekend I was at FOSDEM and I attended Gabor’s talk on packaging CPAN modules for Linux distributions. This has rekindled my interest in this area and I spent most of the train journey back from Brussels hacking around the area.

There’s one thing that has been bothering me in particular recently. The standard RPM building mechanism (or, at least, the way it’s configured in Fedora and Centos) does something incredible brain dead when trying to work out what other modules the current module depends on. It does it by parsing the source code and looking for “use” statements. This means that a module that might only be used in really obscure cases is going to be listed as a mandatory requirement for your module.

Gabor and I actually saw an example of this over the weekend when the Fedora packaging team raised a bug against Padre because it requires Win32::API. Padre, of course, only uses Win32::API when being used on Windows. And for that reason Win32::API is not listed as a dependency in its META.yml.

And that’s, of course, where the RPM builders should be going to get a list of dependencies. META.yml contains the list of other modules that the author wants the module to depend on. This should be seen as the definitive list. Of course, there might be errors in that list – but that should be addressed by raising a bug against the module.

I’ve poked at this problem a few times, trying to work out how the RPM system parses the code and trying to replace that with code that looks at META.yml instead. But the RPM system uses a baroque system of interdependent macros and eventually they all lead to a piece of rather clunky Perl code. So each time I’ve approached this problem, I’ve backed off again.

The problem became more urgent when I wanted to package Plack for Fedora. Plack supports all sorts of hosting environments and therefore includes “use” statements loading a number of modules that most people will never use. Fedora includes Apache2, so Apache::Request (which is for Apache1) will never be available. It’s not listed in META.YML, but it is used by one of the modules. The RPM build system was therefore insisting that it should be present. An impasse was reached.

Then I decided to turn the problem on its head. RPM building has two steps. You create a spec file for the RPM and then you build the RPM using the spec file and your original tarball. I started wondering if I could ensure that the spec had all of the requirements (from the META.yml). Once I’d done that I would only need to find some way to turn off the RPM build system’s default behaviour.

People packaging CPAN modules for Fedora (and Centos) use a program called ‘cpanspec’ to generate spec files. I started digging into the code there in order to find out how to insert the list of correct dependencies.

Only to find that it has already been done. cpanspec is already doing the right thing and generating a list of ‘Requires’ statements from the data in META.yml.

Then all I needed to do was to see if I could turn off the (broken) default RPM build behaviour which was adding spurious extra dependencies. That proved to be easy too. It’s just a case of adding %__perl_requires %{nil} to your .rpmmacros files.

So now all of my RPMs will have only the correct dependencies listed. This makes me very happy.

I suppose I should go back and rebuild all of the older ones too.

Oh, and because I’ve worked out a really easy way to generate this – here’s a spreadsheet listing which CPAN modules are available as RPMs for Fedora. I plan to keep this list up to date (and make it much longer). [Link now fixed]

p.s. More about my trip to FOSDEM and the Perl marketing push there over the next couple of days.