Tag Archives: lpw

Speaking at the LPW

I gave three talks at the London Perl Workshop yesterday[1]. That wasn’t the original plan, but I kept coming up with talks that seemed to be good ideas.

The last one was on 25 Years of Perl was a bit of a failure as I broke the second rule of presenting (always plug in your laptop) and the battery died just as I got to 2012. Which meant that no-one saw my big finish where I pulled out to give an overview of all 25 years and thanked everyone who had ever been involved with Perl.

I’ve put the slides to all three talks on my (new, very much “work in progress”) talks page. It includes a link to all of the 25 years talk.

Thanks (as ever) to all of the organisers, volunteers and speakers at the LPW. The workshop just gets better and better each year.

See you in 2013 – which will be the 10th LPW!

[1] And also spoke on a panel about the state of the jobs market.

LPW Schedule

(You wait weeks for a blog post and then two come along practically together. But this is just another short one.)

It’s the London Perl Workshop on Saturday. The schedule for the day was published some time ago and it’s as diverse and interesting as it always is.

If you look closely at the schedule, each talk has a mysterious-looking number at the end of its description. That’s the number of people who have said they are interested in seeing that talk.

Currently, the highest number I can see on the schedule is 26. There are just under 300 people registered for the workshop. That means that a lot of people haven’t marked the talks that they are interested in.

Marking the talks that you’re interested is useful for a few reasons. Firstly, there’s a page on the site which will show you your personalised schedule which just includes the talks you’ve said you want to see. You could print it out and bring it with you on Saturday (or have that page open on your tablet).

Secondly, it’s useful for the organisers. They have a rough idea of which talks are going to be well-attended, but they can occasionally misjudge it. If they find out that 150 people want to see a talk that they have put in a tiny classroom then they can take appropriate measures (like moving the talk).

And finally, it’s useful for the speakers to have an idea of how many people are interested in their talk.

It’s not hard to register your interest in a talk. Just log in to the workshop web site and go to the schedule page. Every talk will have a star in the top left corner. Clicking that star will register your interest. You’re not actually registering for the talk. No-one is going to do anything if you change your mind on the day and go to a different talk on that day. It’s just so we can all get an idea of the approximate levels of interest in the various talks.

Why not pop over to the schedule page and mark some talks now?

See you on Saturday.

25 Years of Perl

A few days ago, I mentioned that I’m giving a talk at the London Perl Workshop called Twenty Five Years of Perl in Twenty Five (ish) Minutes.

I already have a good idea of how the talk will go. I’ve got a good structure to hang everything off. But I’m still working on the detail. I know I’m very old, but I haven’t been involved with Perl for the whole of its history. And even during the sixteen or do years I’ve been using Perl I’ve almost certainly missed some interesting things.

So I thought I’d crowd-source the talk a bit. What would you include in a history of Perl? What events do you think are important enough to be listed in a twenty minute talk?

Please leave your suggestions in a comment.

London Perl Workshop

Today, the initial list of talks for this year’s London Perl Workshop was announced. Looks like I’ll be giving three talks of various lengths. And of various levels of seriousness.

The rest of the announced talks sounds far more useful. Looks like the workshop will be as good as it always is. If you want to come along (and I highly recommend it), you can register on the web site.

 

London Perl Workshop Review

Unfortunately O’Reilly’s Josette Garcia couldn’t be at the London Perl Workshop, so she asked if I could write something about it for her blog.

It took me longer than it should have done, but my post has just been published over at Josetteorama.

Hopefully Josette will be back at next year’s event. She was much missed (although, of course, Alice did a fine job of making up for Josette’s absence).

A Brief History of the LPW

In his opening remarks on Saturday, Mark Keating suggested that we might be at the tenth London Perl Workshop. That seemed unlikely to me, so I’ve done a little research.

And it seems that I was right. The first LPW was in 2004, which makes this year’s the eighth. In a way, I’m happy that it wasn’t the tenth, as we now have two years to ensure that the tenth LPW is celebrated appropriately.

Here’s a list of the LPWs so far. I’ve also included details of the talks I gave at each workshop – mainly so that I can disprove Mark when he claims that I always show up and run training.

It seems that the web sites for some of the earlier workshops have fallen off the internet. This makes me a little sad. If I’m wrong and it’s just that Google can’t find them, then please let me know.

1st LPW – 11 Dec 2004
Lanyrd link
At Imperial College. I gave a 20 minute talk about OO Perl.

2nd LPW – 26 Nov 2005
Lanyrd link
At City University. I gave a 20 minute talk on Databases and Perl.

3rd LPW – 9 Dec 2006
Lanyrd link
I think this was the first LPW at its current home of the University of Westminster. I can’t be sure as I wasn’t there. I have a good excuse though – I was on holiday celebrating my tenth wedding anniversary.

4th LPW – 1 Dec 2007
Lanyrd link
At the University of Westminster. I gave a training course on Beginning Perl.

5th LPW – 29 Nov 2008
Lanyrd link
At the University of Westminster. I gave the keynote (a history of london.pm as it was our tenth anniversary) and a training course on Web Programming.

6th LPW – 5 Dec 2009
Lanyrd link
At the University of Westminster. I gave the keynote (about marketing Perl) and a training course called “The Professional Programmer“.

7th LPW – 4th Dec 2010
Lanyrd link
At the University of Westminster (although not in the usual building). I gave a training course on Modern Web programming (i.e. Plack) and a talk on Roles and Traits in Moose.

8th LPW – 12 Nov 2011
Lanyrd link
At the University of Westminster. I gave a training course on Modern Core Perl.

Modern Core Perl

The London Perl Workshop is in two weeks time. Have you registered yet? There are apparently 200 people signed up already.

I’m going to be there giving a training course in the morning. It’s called Modern Core Perl and it will introduce many of the new features that have been added to the Perl core since version 5.10.

The course is ninety minutes long and attendance is completely free (as it is for all of the workshop). I was planning to write a post encouraging people to sign-up for the course, but it seems that will be unnecessary. I already have twenty people signed up and until I know for sure how big the room is I’ve had to declare the class full as I don’t want to run the risk of people signing up and not being able to fit into the room.

Unfortunately, though, the workshop web site doesn’t really have the concept of signing up for courses. So it’s impossible to actually stop more people signing up for the course. In fact, two more people have signed up since I edited the description to say the course was full.

I hope that the room will be large enough to allow us to let a few more people in on the day, but we will be strict on not overcrowding the room.

I apologise in advance if you want to come to the course but can’t get in. Perhaps you’ll consider Ian’s course instead. Or there will be three or four tracks of other talks going on at the same time.