Tag Archives: speaking

Talks from Kiev

It has only been a few weeks since YAPC::Europe in Kiev and already all of the videos are available on YouTube. Here are the recordings of my three talks.

On the first day I spoke about “25 Years of Perl”.

Later that day I was one of the lightning talk speakers. My talk starts at about 52 minutes.

Then on the second day I spoke about “Matt’s PSGI Archive”.

Speaking at the LPW

I gave three talks at the London Perl Workshop yesterday[1]. That wasn’t the original plan, but I kept coming up with talks that seemed to be good ideas.

The last one was on 25 Years of Perl was a bit of a failure as I broke the second rule of presenting (always plug in your laptop) and the battery died just as I got to 2012. Which meant that no-one saw my big finish where I pulled out to give an overview of all 25 years and thanked everyone who had ever been involved with Perl.

I’ve put the slides to all three talks on my (new, very much “work in progress”) talks page. It includes a link to all of the 25 years talk.

Thanks (as ever) to all of the organisers, volunteers and speakers at the LPW. The workshop just gets better and better each year.

See you in 2013 – which will be the 10th LPW!

[1] And also spoke on a panel about the state of the jobs market.

25 Years of Perl

A few days ago, I mentioned that I’m giving a talk at the London Perl Workshop called Twenty Five Years of Perl in Twenty Five (ish) Minutes.

I already have a good idea of how the talk will go. I’ve got a good structure to hang everything off. But I’m still working on the detail. I know I’m very old, but I haven’t been involved with Perl for the whole of its history. And even during the sixteen or do years I’ve been using Perl I’ve almost certainly missed some interesting things.

So I thought I’d crowd-source the talk a bit. What would you include in a history of Perl? What events do you think are important enough to be listed in a twenty minute talk?

Please leave your suggestions in a comment.

London Perl Workshop

Today, the initial list of talks for this year’s London Perl Workshop was announced. Looks like I’ll be giving three talks of various lengths. And of various levels of seriousness.

The rest of the announced talks sounds far more useful. Looks like the workshop will be as good as it always is. If you want to come along (and I highly recommend it), you can register on the web site.

 

YAPC::Europe Report

It’s nearly three weeks since I got back from Riga. I should probably tell you a bit about what I did.

I flew over on Saturday and on Sunday I gave my “Introduction to Modern Perl” talk. There were nine people on the course and they all seemed to find it useful.

The conference itself started on Monday with a welcome from Andrew Shitov followed by the announcement that next year’s YAPC will be in Frankfurt. Then Larry gave his keynote where he compared Perl to musical styles (and architecture). He was followed by Matt Trout talking about the various philosophical styles required in good documentation. I then stayed in the main hall to see Mallory van Achterberg describing HTML5 and Zefram talking about his latest experiments in bending Perl syntax using some of the new features in Perl 5.14.

I think I spent the first session after lunch talking to various people in hallways and then I went back to the main hall to see Chisel Wright talking about mostly lazy DBIx::Class testing followed by Zefram describing (in great detail) why time is so hard. After a coffee break Book introduced his modules for controlling git from Perl.

Then we had the lightning talks (including my talk which suggested that the Perl community should become a secret society) and the auction – unusually on the first day rather than the last one.

The second day started with Damian Conway explaining how he has converted some of his CPAN modules to Perl 6 and how much simpler a lot of the code got in the process. I then watched Aaron Crane explain why monkey-patching is a problem and how subclassing is often no better. I then saw Max Maischein introducing Flottr and Andrew Solomon running a beginners tutorial about Dancer.

After lunch I went to see Peter Rabbitson talking about DBIx::Class internals followed by Karen Pauley talking about The Perl Foundation. I was happy to she that she took my lightning talk’s “going underground” theme and used it as an excuse to include a picture of the wombles.

One of the highlights of the conference for me was Tara Andrews talking about how she uses Perl in her work on Medieval manuscripts. That was followed by Mark Keating talking about marketing (Mark Keating/marketing – geddit?). Then there was the second lot of lightning talks followed by the attendees dinner where we all ate too much from the buffet and drank too much beer.

Wednesday began with Jesse Vincent’s vision of what Perl might be like moving forward from 5.16. He’s got some great ideas. And somehow he and Leon Brocard persuaded me to volunteer to put out a Perl release next April. That’ll be interesting. Following that I went briefly into Ingy’s talk on post-modern packaging but I wasn’t wasn’t really concentrating as I was getting ready for my talk on Perl Training which was next. I talked about my experiences of ten years running Perl training courses. After that I relaxed by listening to Matt Trout talking about Data::Query.

After lunch I saw Mark Keating talking about the Perl community (and why he loves it so much). I followed that by sitting in Patrick Michaud and Leon Timmermann’s talks, but I confess I was really catching up on email and not really concentrating. Then there was Matt Trout’s State of the Velociraptor, the final set of lightning talks and the Frankfurt.pm team talking about their plans for next year.

And then it was over. Another great YAPC::Europe conference which seemed far too short. Many thanks to all of the organisers for doing such a great .job.

Modern Perl Web Development

Last Saturday was the annual London Perl Workshop. I’ll have more to say about the day later[1], but I just wanted to take the time to share the slides for the workshop that I ran in the morning. It was a quick guide to modern Perl web development. And, as far as I’m concerned, that basically means PSGI and Plack.

Update: People asked me to put the example PSGI apps from the workshop online somewhere. They’re now all on github. Let me know if you find them at all useful.

[1] Executive summary: a wonderful day, thanks to everyone who was involved – particularly Mark Keating.

Evolving Software with Moose

Last night I was speaking at the Milton Keynes Perl Mongers technical meeting. I gave a new talk about how Moose (and, in particular, Moose traits) make Perlanet easier to maintain and enhance. The slides are available on Slideshare.