Training Courses – More Details

Last week I mentioned the public training courses that I’ll be running in London next February. A couple of people got in touch and asked if I had more details of the contents of the courses. That makes sense of course, I don’t expect people to pay £300 for a days training without knowing a bit about the syllabus.

So here are details of the first two courses (the Moose one and the DBIx::Class one). I hope to have details of the others available by next weekend.

Object Oriented Programming with Perl and Moose

  • Introduction to Object Oriented programming
  • Overview of Moose
  • Object Attributes
  • Subclasses
  • Object construction
  • Data types
  • Delegation
  • Roles
  • Meta-programming
  • Further information

Database Programming with Perl and DBIx::Class

  • Brief introduction to relational databases
  • Introduction to databases and Perl
    • DBI
    • ORM
  • Schema Classes
  • Basic DB operations
    • CRUD
  • Advanced queries
    • Ordering, joining, grouping
  • Extending DBIC
  • Further information

If you have any further questions, please either ask them in the comments or email me (I’m dave at this domain).

And if I’ve sold you on the idea of these courses, the booking page is now open.

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Public Training in London – February 2016

For several years I’ve been running an annual set of public training courses in London in conjunction with FLOSS UK (formerly known as UKUUG). For various scheduling reasons, we didn’t get round to running any this year, but we have already made plans for next year.

I’ll be running five days of training in central London from 8th – 12th February. The courses will take place at the Ambassador’s Hotel on Upper Woburn Place. Full details are in the process of appearing on the FLOSS UK web site, but the booking page doesn’t seem to be live yet, so I can’t tell you how much it will cost.

We’re doing something a little different this year. In previous years, I’ve been running two generic two-day courses – one on intermediate Perl and one on advanced Perl. This year we’re running a number of shorter but more focussed courses. The complete list is:

  • Object Oriented Programming with Perl and Moose (Mon 8th Feb)
  • Database Programming with Perl and DBIx::Class (Tue 9th Feb)
  • An Introduction to Testing Perl Programs (Wed 10th Feb)
  • Modern Web Programming with Perl (two day course – Thu/Fri 11th/12th Feb)

This new approach came out of some feedback we’ve received from attendees over the last couple of years. I’m hoping that by offering this shorter courses, people will be able to take more of a “mix and match” approach and will select courses that better fit their requirements. Of course, if you’re interested, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t come to all five days.

I’ll update this page when I know how much the courses will cost and how you can book. But please put these dates in your calendar.

Update: And less than 24 hours after publishing this blog post, the booking page has gone live.

Places are £300 a day (so £600 for the two-day course on web programming) and there’s a special offer of £1,320 for the full week.

Prices are cheaper (by £90 a day) for members. And given that an annual individual membership costs £35, that all sounds like a bit of a no-brainer to me.

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Beginners Perl Tutorial

A few weeks ago I got an interesting email from someone at Udemy. They were looking for someone to write a beginners Perl tutorial that they would make available for free on their web site. I think I wasn’t the only person that they got in touch with but, after a brief email conversation, they asked me to go ahead and write it.

It turned out to be harder that I thought it would be. I expected that I could write about 6,000 words over a weekend. In the end it took two weekends and it stretched to over 8,000 words. The problem is not in the writing, it’s in deciding what to omit. I’m sure that if you read it you’ll find absolutely essential topics that I haven’t included – but I wonder what you would have dropped to make room for them.

But eventually I finished it, delivered it to them (along with an invoice – hurrah!) and waited to hear that they had published it.

Yesterday I heard that it was online. Not from Udemy (they had forgotten to tell me that it was published two weeks ago) but from a friend.

Unfortunately, some gremlins had crept in at some point during their publication pipeline. Some weird character substitutions had taken place (which had disastrous consequences for some of the Perl code examples) and a large number of paragraph breaks had vanished. But I reported those all to Udemy yesterday and I see they have all been fixed overnight.

So finally I can share the tutorial with you. Please feel free to share it with people who might find it useful.

Although it’s 8,000 words long, it really only scratches the surface of the language. Udemy have added a link to one of their existing Perl courses, but unfortunately it’s not a very good Perl course (Udemy don’t seem to have any very good Perl courses). I understand why they have done that (that is, after all, the whole point of commissioning this tutorial – to drive more people to pay for Perl courses on tutorial) but it’s a shame that there isn’t anything of higher quality available.

So there’s an obvious hole in Udemy’s offerings. They don’t have a high quality Perl course. That might be a hole that I try to fill when I next get some free time.

Unless any other Perl trainers want to beat me to it.

Oh, and please let me know what you think of the tutorial.

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DBIC Training in Granada

It’s been a while since I’ve run a training course alongside a YAPC. By my calculations, the last time was Riga in 2011. But I’ve been talking to the organisers of this year’s conference and we have plan.

I’m going to be running a one-day introductory course on DBIx::Class before the conference (I think it’ll be on 1st September, but that’s not 100% certain yet). Full details are on the conference web site. There’s an early-bird price of 150 Euro and the full price is 200 Euro. The web site says that the early-bird price finishes today, but I wouldn’t be at all surprised if that gets extended for a few days at least.

Of course, readers of this blog will all already be experts in DBIC and won’t need this course. But I’m sure that most of you will have a colleague who would benefit from… well… a refresher on who DBIC works. Why not see if your company will pay for them to attend the course :-)

The course size is limited. So you might want to think about booking soon.

Hope to see some of you in Granada.

Two updates:

  1. The date has now been confirmed as 1st September.
  2. The early-bird pricing has been extended until 1st June.
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Upcoming Training

I have a few training courses coming up in the next few weeks which I thought you might be interested in.

Firstly, the London Perl Workshop is on 8th November. I’ll be giving a two hour talk on “Perl in the Internet of Things“. As always, the workshop is free, but please register on the site and star my talk if you’re planning on attending.

Then the week after I’m running two two-day courses in conjunction with FLOSS UK. On Tuesday 11th and Wednesday 12th it’s “Intermediate Perl” and on Thursday 13th and Friday 14th it’s “Advanced Perl Techniques”. Full details and a booking for are on the FLOSS UK web site.

Note: If you’re interested in the FLOSS UK courses, then please don’t pay the eye-watering non-member price (£720!) Simply join FLOSS UK (which costs £42) and then pay the member price of £399.

Hope to see you at one of this courses.

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Training in London

For many years now a regular feature of my training calendar has been the annual public courses that I have run in London in conjunction with FlossUK. Normally these happen in February, but this year I had to postpone them as I was in the USA for a lot of February.

But FlossUK still wanted to do them, so we’ve arranged to run the courses in November instead. There will be two two-day courses which will be held at the Ambassadors Hotel in central London.

For full details (and soon, I hope, a booking form) see the FlossUK web site.


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Perl School: DBIx::Class

Update: I’m sorry to have to announce that this course has been cancelled. I hope to reschedule for later in the year.

Tempus fugit and another Perl School rolls around.

Next Saturday (June 8th) I’ll be running my one-day course on Database Programming with Perl and DBIx::Class. As always the course will take place at Google Campus in London and tickets for the course cost £30.

The course is aimed at people who know Perl but would like an introduction to modern database programming using DBIx::Class. Full details of the topics covered are on the Perl School web site, where you’ll also find a booking form.

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Moose Course This Saturday

I’m running another Perl School this Saturday (6th April). This time the subject is Object Oriented Programming with Perl and Moose. I ran a two-hour taster version of this course at the London Perl Workshop back in November, but this is the full six-hour version. Tickets are £30 each.

The course is run at Google Campus on the outskirts of the City of London. There’s a full list of topics and a booking form over on the Perl School web site.

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Training Cancelled

A few weeks ago, I mentioned that I had two days of public training coming up in Manchester in April. I’ve just heard that the organisers have decided to cancel this training as they have had no bookings for the classes. I’m sorry if anyone was planning to book closer to the date and has been inconvenienced by this.

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Training Debrief

I’ve spent a lot of the last seven days running training courses. It might be interesting to share some thoughts about how they went.

Last Saturday was Perl School 4. A week before the course I was a little worried about ticket sales, but I did a bit of marketing early last week and managed to more than double sales in a few days. In the end I had 27 people signed up.

Perl School is always enjoyable. I think that people often turn up with quite low expectations as it’s so cheap. So it’s fun to overturn those expectations and give them a day of high quality training. People obviously recognise that as I’m getting a lot of repeat business – at least one person has come along to three of the four courses so far.

Many of the courses I give are overviews of Perl at various levels. This one was just about DBIx::Class so it was great to be able to go into a lot more depth on a single topic. Of course, DBIx::Class is a great subject to cover and it was fun explaining its more powerful corners to a room of people who don’t know much about it.

I thought it went well. But don’t just take my word for it. I’ve been asking attendees to fill in feedback forms about all the Perl School courses and I’ve published a page summarising that feedback.

Then this week has been two two-day courses for flossUK. Two day courses give us time to include practical sessions so that people go home having actually tried out the techniques that I’ve taught – which nicely reinforces the lessons. I really enjoy those sessions as you really see lightbulb moments as people see how easy it is to use these tools. This afternoon, for example, it was great to see people getting a simple Catalyst application up and running in less than an hour. An hour later people were really impressed as I introduced them to Plack::Middleware::Debug and showed them how I could get detailed DBIC_TRACE output on the web page by making tiny changes to the application code. At least one person went away determined to reimplement a number of key applications in Catalyst as soon as possible.

And that, to me, is the joy of running training courses. It’s great to open people’s eyes to the possibilities that these new tools give them. I love to see them leave filled with renewed enthusiasm for the language.

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