Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer2

Here are some more details of the Modern Web Development with Perl and Dancer2 course that I’ll be running in Cluj-Napoca on the day before YAPC Europe.

The course runs a full day (that’s six hours – in four 90-minute sessions with breaks in between). It’s a hands-on course – you’ll need to bring a laptop and closer to the time I’ll email attendees with details of the software they will need to have installed. Like all of the pre-conference training, the course will take place at Cluj Hub on Tuesday 23rd August.

Over the course of twelve steps, we’ll build a simple Todo list program. We’ll be using a number of modern web development techniques (not just Perl) in order to make the app look really shiny and modern.

The twelve steps we will be taking are as follows:

  1. Set up a basic Dancer2 app
  2. Make it look nicer with the addition of the Bootstrap CSS framework
  3. Use Plack Middleware to serve static content more efficiently
  4. Display some data in our app
  5. Get the data from a database
  6. Return the data as JSON and display it using Mustache
  7. Use jQuery to show/hide completed items
  8. Mark items as completed
  9. Add new tasks to the app
  10. Add user login
  11. Edit and delete tasks
  12. Add tags to tasks and filter the display on those tags

If there’s time left at the end, we’ll discuss other useful enhancements that we might want to make to the app – and perhaps even try adding them.

We’ll be using the following Perl tools:

And the following non-Perl tools:

Usually, a course like this would cost around £300. But because it’s at YAPC and the sponsors are so generous, we can offer it for the heavily discounted price of 100€.

Cluj Hub sounds like a fabulous venue for the training courses and I’m sure that the day will be a lot of fun. Perhaps more importantly, I’m also sure that attendees will come away with some useful skills to add to their CVs.

Tickets are on sale now. Please buy quickly – before they sell out.

Training in Cluj – The Poll

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I was planning to run a one-day training course the day before YAPC Europe in Cluj-Napoca this year. There have been a few discussions of my ideas in a various forums, so now it’s time for the next stage.

Below, you’ll see a simple questionnaire. Please use it to give your feedback on what course you would like me to run – and how much you think it should cost.

I’ll collate all of the responses in a couple of weeks and make an announcement about what I’m going to do.

Training in Cluj

I’m going to be running a day of training before YAPC Europe in Cluj. It’ll be on Tuesday 23rd August. But that’s all I know about the course so far, because I want your help to plan it.

Training has been a part of the YAPC experience for a long time. And I’ve often run courses alongside YAPC Europe. I took a look back through my talk archives and this is what I found.

  • 2003 (Paris) – I gave a half-day tutorial on “Tieing and Overloading Objects”
  • 2006 (Birmingham) – Another half-day tutorial called “Advanced Databases for Beginners”
  • 2008 (Copenhagen) – The “Perl Teach-In” was a one-day course about new and interesting Perl tools
  • 2009 (Lisbon) – A two-day “Introduction to Perl” course
  • 2010 (Pisa) – “Introducing Modern Perl”
  • 2011 (Riga) – “Introducing Modern Perl” (I had completely forgotten giving the same course two years running)
  • 2015 (Granada) – “Database Programming with DBIx::Class and Perl”

The first two (the half-day courses) were both given as part of the main conference. The others were all separate courses run before the conference. For those, you needed to pay extra – but it was a small amount compared with normal Perl training rates.

So now it’s 2016 and I want to run a training course in Cluj. But what should it be about? That’s where you come it. I want you to tell me what you want training on.

I’m happy to update any of the courses listed above. Or, perhaps I could cover something new this year. I have courses that I have never given at YAPC – on Moose, testing, web development and other things. Or I’d be happy to come up with something completely new that you want to hear about.

Please comment on this post, telling me your opinions. I’ll let the discussion run for a couple of weeks, then I’ll collate the most popular-looking choices and run a poll to choose which course I’m going to run.

Don’t forget – training in Cluj on 23rd August. If you’re booking travel and accommodation for the conference then please take that into account.

Oh, and hopefully it won’t just be me. If you’re a trainer and you’re going to be in Cluj for the conference, then please get in touch and we’ll add you to the list. The more courses we can offer, the better.

So here’s your chance to control the YAPC training schedule. What courses would you like to see?

Training Debrief

During the second week of February, I ran my (approximately) annual public Perl training courses in association with FlossUK. Things were organised slightly differently this year. Previously we’ve run two two-day “general purpose” courses – one on Intermediate Perl and one on Advanced Perl. This year we ran four courses, each of which were on a more specific technology. There were one-day courses on Moose, DBIx::Class and testing and a two-day course on web development.

Class numbers weren’t huge during the week. We had about six people on each of the days. That’s a large enough class to get plenty of discussion and interaction going but, to be honest, I’d be happier if we got a few more people in. The attendees were split pretty much down the middle between people who working for commercial organisations and people who worked for universities. I’m sorry to report that there were no women booked on any of the courses this year.

As is often the case on these courses most of the attendees had been using Perl for a long time and were pretty comfortable with some quite advanced Perl features. But, for various reasons, they simply hadn’t had the time to investigate some of the newer Perl tools that would have made their lives much easier. I often get people at these courses telling me that the best thing about the course is just having a day set aside where they can try out cool new technologies that they have heard of without the worry of someone calling them away to deal with some vital production issue (this, incidentally, is also why most trainers far prefer off-site training courses).

We started on day one with Moose. Most of them had used “classic” Perl OO techniques and were well aware of how baroque that can become. They were therefore very interested in the more declarative approach that Moose gave them. By the end of the day our Dalek class was using roles, traits, type coercion and many other useful Moose features.

Day two was DBIx::Class. Everyone was using a database of some kind and all of them were using DBI to interface to their database. I really enjoy introducing people like that to DBIx::Class. Once they’ve run dbicdump and have generated classes for their own databases most people’s eyes light up when they see ho much easier their code can become. As a bonus, this class contained no-one who needed to be persuaded of the benefits of defining foreign keys in your DDL and making use of referential integrity checks.

The third day was testing. I mean, it was about testing – not that it was particularly difficult. The class was full of people who knew the benefits of testing but who were maintaining large codebases with hardly any (in some cases no) tests. In the morning we looked at how simple the Perl testing framework is, did a quick survey of some useful testing modules on CPAN and even looked at writing our own testing modules. In the afternoon we expanded that to look at mocking objects and Test::Class. I think the most popular sections were when I introduced Devel::Cover and the concept of continuous integration. I encouraged them to write even just a few tests and to hook their test suite up to a highly visible Jenkins job. If you make your lack of test coverage obvious, then other people in the team can be encouraged to help improve it out of sheer embarrassment.

Thursday was the first day of the two-day course on web development. The first day concentrated on PSGI and Plack. We looked at what they are and how they make web development simpler. We also looked at ways to run non-PSGI applications in a PSGI environment in order to benefit from PSGI’s advantages. This seemed to really engage a couple of people in the class who used a practical session at the end of the day to start working to get their own legacy apps running under PSGI. I was particularly pleased when, the next morning, one of them told me that he had continued to work on the problem overnight and that he had got a huge system that used a combination of CGI and mod_perl working under PSGI. He was really happy too.

On the final day, we looked at web frameworks in Perl. The morning was all about Dancer2. We started by building a small web app and I showed them how simple it was to interface with a database and to add authentication to the system. Later on we added an API to the app so that it could return JSON or XML instead of web pages. Early in the afternoon, I took that a step further and demonstrated Web::Machine and WebAPI::DBIC. The rest of the afternoon was about Catalyst. We built another app (similar to the Dancer on from the morning) using the standard Catalyst tutorial as a basis. I’m not sure how well this went, to be honest. Following the simplicity of Dancer with the (relative) complexity of Catalyst wasn’t, perhaps, the best advert for Catalyst.

But, all in all, I think the week went really well. I sent a small but enthusiastic group of people back to their offices with a new interest in using Modern Perl tools in their day-to-day work. And, perhaps more usefully, I think that many of them will be getting more involved in the Perl community. A few of them said “see you at the LPW” as they left.

I’m running a half-day workshop on Modern Perl Web Development at  the FlossUK Spring Conference next month. Other than that, I don’t have any public courses planned. But if you think that your company would find my training useful, then please get in touch.

Training Courses – More Details

Last week I mentioned the public training courses that I’ll be running in London next February. A couple of people got in touch and asked if I had more details of the contents of the courses. That makes sense of course, I don’t expect people to pay £300 for a days training without knowing a bit about the syllabus.

So here are details of the first two courses (the Moose one and the DBIx::Class one). I hope to have details of the others available by next weekend.

Object Oriented Programming with Perl and Moose

  • Introduction to Object Oriented programming
  • Overview of Moose
  • Object Attributes
  • Subclasses
  • Object construction
  • Data types
  • Delegation
  • Roles
  • Meta-programming
  • Further information

Database Programming with Perl and DBIx::Class

  • Brief introduction to relational databases
  • Introduction to databases and Perl
    • DBI
    • ORM
  • Schema Classes
  • Basic DB operations
    • CRUD
  • Advanced queries
    • Ordering, joining, grouping
  • Extending DBIC
  • Further information

If you have any further questions, please either ask them in the comments or email me (I’m dave at this domain).

And if I’ve sold you on the idea of these courses, the booking page is now open.