Monthly Archives: November 2009

Blogs.perl.org Problems

It’s ten days since we announced blogs.perl.org and it still doesn’t work properly.

Our mistake was to launch it on a really underpowered server. It worked fine when there were half a dozen of us testing it out, but when the entire Perl community descended on it to take a look at the site (and to sign up for accounts) the server collapsed under the strain.

All of the problems that I’ve been told about so far have been down to memory allocation issues. The server has 512 MB (corrected from KB – it’s bad, but not that bad!) of RAM and it really needs four times that.

Things have calmed down over the last few days though. I suspect that’s largely because people have lost interest in the site and have given up trying to register. We’ve also switched all of the MT processes to using FCGI. I see that a few people have registered successfully and are posting entries on the site. I salute their persistence.

We have a plan for fixing the situation, however, and that will be put in place over the next week or so. The site will be moving to a new server with a more appropriate hardware configuration. We hope to minimise the amount of downtime whilst this happens.

I can only apologise, once more, for the problems. I hope that once the new server is up and running, you’ll all consider giving blogs.perl.org another try.

I hope it’s obvious, but none of these problems should be taken as a reflection on the quality of Movable Type or the work that Six Apart have done for us on the site. The problems all come down to capacity planning on the part of the people running the project.

Which reminds me – if you’re ever looking for someone to do capacity planning on your web site, I’m not the right person for the job!

My Sekrit Project

It’s quite possible that over the last year or so you’ve heard me muttering about a secret project that I’ve been working on. Well, this morning I can finally reveal what it is.

Do you ever wish that the Perl community had a centralised blogging site where anyone could set up a blog for free? Something, perhaps, that allows you to use modern blogging features like images in your posts or tags.

If you’ve ever wished for something like that, then can I suggest that you take a look at blogs.perl.org. I think it might be just what you’re looking for.

The site is built using Movable Type and we were lucky enough to get some people from Six Apart to build it for us. I’d like to particularly thank Steve Cook of their professional services division who has done a lot of the actual work. Thanks also go to Jeremy King who designed the site and David Jacobs who is their manager and allowed them to work on the project on company time.

From the Perl community I need to thanks Aaron Crane who is hosting the site and Curtis Poe and Aristotle Pagaltzis who have both been involved in planning this project. Many other people have given invaluable advice or have been early testers of the site. Thanks to everyone who has been involved.

All that remains now is for you to try it out. You should regard it as a beta test version, so some of you will find problems. When you do, please just let me know and we’ll fix them.

I hope you enjoy the site and find it useful.

Update: Yes, there seems to be one quite glaring problem with it. That’s the web server errors that are generated occasionally when someone tries to log in (or out). Seems to be a resource allocation issue with the server. We’re looking into it. Please bear with me.

London Perl Workshop

The London Perl Workshop is getting closer. It’s on Saturday 5th December at the University of Westminster’s Cavendish Street Campus (the same place it’s been for the last few years).

The schedule was announced a couple of days ago and, at always, it looks like a great line-up. I’m particularly pleased to see that Tatsuhiko Miyagawa will be there talking about Plack and PSGI‎ (although, slightly less pleased to see that it clashes with a presentation that I’m involved with).

I’m going to be involved in a few things at the workshop. They’ve invited me to give the keynote again, so I’m giving a talk called The “M” Word‎. Later in the day I’m giving a two hour tutorial called The Professional Programmer which will discuss some of the practicalities of working in the IT industry (this is largely aimed at the university’s students but others will also be welcome). Finally, towards the end of the day, I’ll be speaking alongside Matt Trout, Curtis Poe and Ed Freyfogle on a panel called Skills in the Workplace.

The LPW is always a great day. I hope you’ll come along and join in. Oh, and even if you can’t make it you can pretend you were there by buying one of the workshop t-shirts.

Socialable Mongers

One of the nice things about the Perl community is its friendliness. I’ve met up with Perl Mongers on three continents. It’s easy, if you’re going past a city you just look for local groups on the pm.org web site and drop them a mail. There are hundreds of cities in the world where I can be guaranteed finding someone to share a beer or a pizza with.

And over the next few days I’m going to see both sides of that equation.

Tonight there’s a london.pm emergency meeting. The emergency is that there are a couple of visitors in town and it would be rude if we didn’t entertain them. The visitors are David Adler (dha) from New York and Gianni Ceccarelli (dakkar) from Italy. We’ll be in the Star Tavern from about 6:30pm.

Then over the weekend I’ll be in Edinburgh. And that means spending an evening with edinburgh.pm. I’ll be meeting them at the Cumberland Bar at about 7pm on Sunday.

You would, of course, be most welcome at either of these events.

And the next time you’re travelling the world (or even just travelling round your country) why not give it a try. Get in touch with a Perl Monger group and let some locals show you around,

A Teaser

It’s coming up to ten days since my last post and if I don’t post something soon my Iron Man status will drop back to paper. And we don’t want that to happen, do we? But I don’t have anything new to write about. My spare time recently has been largely taken up by preparing the training courses for later this month.

What I do have is a bit of a teaser for you. A project that I’ve been involved with for over a year will be launching in the next few days. I think it’s something that the Perl community is really going to love. I’m so excited!

Are teasers considered cheating in the Iron Man challenge?