When I write replies to questions on StackOverflow and places like that recommending that people abandon CGI programs in favour of something that uses PSGI, I often get some push-back from people claiming that PSGI makes things far too complicated.

I don’t believe that’s true. But I think I know why they say it. I think they say it because most of the time when we say “you should really port that code to PSGI” we follow up with links to Dancer, Catalyst or Mojolicious tutorials.

I know why we do that. I know that a web framework is usually going to make writing a web app far simpler. And, yes, I know that in the Plack::Request documentation, Miyagawa explicitly says:

Note that this module is intended to be used by Plack middleware developers and web application framework developers rather than application developers (end users).

Writing your web application directly using Plack::Request is certainly possible but not recommended: it’s like doing so with mod_perl’s Apache::Request: yet too low level.

If you’re writing a web application, not a framework, then you’re encouraged to use one of the web application frameworks that support PSGI (http://plackperl.org/#frameworks), or see modules like HTTP::Engine to provide higher level Request and Response API on top of PSGI.

And, in general, I agree with him wholeheartedly. But I think that when we’re trying to persuade people to switch to PSGI, these suggestions can get in the way. People see switching their grungy old CGI programs to a web framework as a big job. I don’t think it’s as scary as they might think, but I agree it’s often a non-trivial task.

Even without using a web framework, I think that you can get benefits from moving software to PSGI. When I’m running training courses on PSGI, I emphasise three advantages that PSGI gives you over other Perl web development environments.

  1. PSGI applications are easier to debug and test.
  2. PSGI applications can be deployed in any environment you want without changing a line of code.
  3. Plack Middleware

And I think that you can benefit from all of these features pretty easily, without moving to a framework. I’ve been thinking about the best way to do this and I think I’ve come up with a simple plan:

  • Change your shebang line to /usr/bin/plackup (or equivalent)
  • Put all of your code inside my $app = sub { ... }
  • Switch to using Plack::Request to access all of your input parameters
  • Build up your response output in a variable
  • At the end of the code, create and return the required Plack response (either using Plack::Response or just creating the correct array reference).

That’s all you need. You can drop your new program into your cgi-bin directory and it will just start working. You can immediately benefit from easier testing and later on, you can easily deploy your application in a different environment or start adding in middleware.

As an experiment to find how easy this was, I’ve been porting some old CGI programs. Back in 2000, I wrote three articles introducing CGI programming for Linux Format. I’ve gone back to those articles and converted the CGI programs to PSGI (well, so far I’ve done the programs from the first two articles – I’ll finish the last one in the next day or so, I hope).

It’s not the nicest of code. I was still using the CGI’s HTML generation functions back then. I’ve replaced those calls with HTML::Tiny. And they aren’t very complicated programs at all (they were aimed at complete beginners). But I hope they’ll be a useful guide to how easy it is to start using PSGI.

My programs are on Github. Please let me know what you think.

If you’re interested in modern Perl Web Development Techniques, you might find it useful to attend my upcoming two-day course on the subject.

Update: On Twitter, Miyagawa reminds me that you can use CGI::Emulate::PSGI or CGI::PSGI to run CGI programs under PSGI without changing them at all (or, at least, changing them a lot less than I’m suggesting here). And that’s what I’d probably do if I had a large amount of CGI code that I wanted to to move to PSGI quickly. But I still think it’s worth showing people that simple PSGI programs really aren’t any more complicated than simple CGI programs.

Modern Perl Web Development

Last Saturday was the annual London Perl Workshop. I’ll have more to say about the day later[1], but I just wanted to take the time to share the slides for the workshop that I ran in the morning. It was a quick guide to modern Perl web development. And, as far as I’m concerned, that basically means PSGI and Plack.

Update: People asked me to put the example PSGI apps from the workshop online somewhere. They’re now all on github. Let me know if you find them at all useful.

[1] Executive summary: a wonderful day, thanks to everyone who was involved – particularly Mark Keating.