Modern Perl in Linux Format

A couple of times, I’ve complained here about the standard of Perl articles in the British magazine Linux Format.

Following the second of those articles I got into a discussion with Graham Morrison, the editor of the magazine and he offered me the opportunity to improve matters by writing my own short series of tutorials for them.

The first of those tutorials appears in issue 151 of the magazine which will be appearing in UK newsagents about now.

The series is called “Modern Perl” (in an attempt to distance it from their earlier tutorials) and the first article is about how easy it is to write a database application using DBIx::Class. The second article will take the same database and build it into a simple web application using Dancer. That will hopefully be in issue 153 (skipping an issue). There will probably be a third article in the series which will add features to the web application.

I’ll find out what my rights are to the articles and hopefully I’ll be able to put them on the web at some point in the future.

If you see a copy in your newsagents then please consider picking it up. And if you enjoy the article, then please let the magazine know.

Modern Core Perl at the LPW

This year’s London Perl Workshop will be on November 12th. We’ve just tied down the details of the free training course that I’ll be running on the day.

It will be called “Modern Core Perl” and will be a two-hour discussion of how the Perl core has changed since Perl 5.10.

More details nearer the date.

Training in Riga

YAPC Europe is getting closer. We’ll all be heading off to Riga in about six weeks.

As has become traditional, there are a number of training courses being held both before and after the conference. This includes my Introduction to Modern Perl course on Sunday 15th August.

The course is a one-day overview of many of the major modules that make up the modern Perl toolset. If you feel that you need a quick refresher on things like Template Toolkit, Moose, DBIx::Class, Catalyst and Plack before diving into the conference proper, then this might well be just what you are after.

The cost is 180 € and you can buy a ticket when paying for the main conference.

There are many other course available too – from well-known Perl trainers like Damian Conway, brian d foy and Gabor Szabo. All of the courses are priced well below our usual rates.

I look forward to seeing you in Riga.

Modern Perl at OpenTech


OpenTech is an annual one-day conference in London where geeks get together and share information about cool things they are doing with technology. The emphasis is on projects that improve society in some way so you’ll see a lot of talks about really interesting projects. Usually the talks concentrate more on the user aspects of the projects and it’s rare to hear very much detail about the underlying technologies.

I was therefore slightly surprised to be invited to invited to give a talk about Modern Perl at this year’s conference. But I grasped the opportunity to speak to a room of geeks who might not be keeping up to date with Perl technology.

The slides are now on SlideShare. Bear in mind that I was aiming at a non-Perly crowd and that I only had twenty minutes – so it’s possible that I didn’t have time to cover your favourite Modern Perl project.


Modern Perl at OpenTech

I mentioned a few months ago that I’d be running an “Introduction to Modern Perl” training course at YAPC::Europe this year. But in the interests of speaking outside of the Perl community as much as possible, I’m also going to be giving a slightly different version of that course at the OpenTech conference in London in September.

I say “slightly different”, but that’s a bit of an understatement. The original training course runs for six hours. The OpenTech talk is twenty minutes. But hopefully that will be long enough to introduce some people to many of the interesting things that are going on in the Perl world.
It you’re going to be in London in September, then the OpenTech conference is always a lot of fun. I highly recommend that you come along. It’s cheap too – just a fiver on the door.