Mailing Lists

Over the years I’ve set up a few mailing lists for the discussion of various projects I’ve been involved with. There’s always an expectation that mailing lists will flourish without much input from me. But it never works out like that.

The truth is that most mailing lists just quietly die. And, in many cases, they end up attracting a lot of spam – which the owner of the list has to check on a semi-regular basis on the off-chance that there’s something interesting or useful in amongst the crap. There never is.

So I’ve decided to close a few mailing lists that didn’t seem to be going anywhere. I don’t suppose anyone will miss them, but I’ve taken a copy of the archives and I may do something with them at some point in the future.

The lists that I have removed are:

  • perlanet@perlhacks.com
  • perl-api-squad@perlhacks.com
  • perl-mooc@perlhacks.com
  • training-news@learnperl.co.uk
  • xml-feed@perlhacks.com

A couple of these lists have received slightly special treatment. The xml-feed list is advertised as the support email address for XML::Feed. I’ve redirected that address so that mail now comes to me. Hopefully my spam filters will ensure that I’m not overrun with spam from it before I work out a more permanent solution.

The other list that has been treated differently is the training-news one. That was set up so that people could get information about upcoming training courses that I would be running. I still think that’s useful, so I’ve replaced it with a new list (run by MailChimp). If you’re interested in keeping in touch with what I’m doing then please sign up to the new list by entering your email address below. (The same form will now appear in the sidebar on every page of this site.)


Sign up here for occasional email about stuff I'm doing with Perl, information about upcoming talks and training courses and other updates.

(I promise not to spam you.)


So, there you are. I’ve removed a few moribund mailing lists. I hope that hasn’t ruined anyone’s day.

Perl Recruitment Thoughts

Not many weeks go by when I don’t hear of another Perl-using company that has been evaluating alternative technologies. In most cases, it’s not because they think that Perl is a bad language to use. The most common reason I hear is that it is becoming harder and harder to find good Perl programmers.

On Quora I recently saw a question asking what job opportunities were like for Perl programmers. This is how I answered:

Right now is a good time to be a Perl programmer. Perl is losing mindshare. Very few new Perl programmers are arriving on the scene and quite a lot of former Perl programmers have moved away from the language to what they see as more lucrative, enjoyable or saleable languages.

But there are still a lot of companies with a lot of Perl code. That all needs to be maintained and enhanced. And many of those companies continue to write new projects in Perl too.

All of which means that it’s a seller’s market for good Perl skills. That won’t last forever, of course. To be honest, I’d be surprised if it lasts for more than five or ten years (well, unless Perl 6 takes off quickly). But it’ll do me for the next few years at least.

I’m putting a positive spin on it, but it’s getting to be a real problem. More programmers abandon Perl, that makes it harder to find good Perl programmers, which makes it more likely that companies will abandon Perl, which leads to fewer Perl jobs and more programmers decide to abandon Perl. It’s a vicious circle.

I’m not sure how we get to the root of that problem, but do have some suggestions for on particular area. A client recently asked my for suggestions on how they can improve their hit rate for recruiting good Perl programmers. My suggestions all revolved about making your company better known in the Perl community (because that’s where many of the better Perl programmers are).

I know that many of the Perl-using companies already know this. But in the interests of levelling the playing field, I thought was worth sharing some of my suggestions.

Perl Mongers Social Meetings

Do you have a local Perl Mongers group? If so, they almost certainly have monthly social meetings. And in many cases they will welcome a company that puts a few quid behind the bar for drinks at one of those meetings. For smaller groups (and there are many smaller groups) you might even offer to buy them dinner.

It’s worth contacting them before doing this. Just turning up and flashing your money around might be seen as rude. And some groups might object to this kind of commercialisation. But it’s always worth asking.

Perl Mongers Technical Meeting

Some Perl Mongers groups have technical meetings (either instead of or as well as social meetings). In this case, instead of meeting in a pub (or bar or restaurant), they’ll meet in the offices of a friendly local company and some of the members will give presentations to the group. Many groups struggle to find venues for these kinds of meetings. Why not offer your office? And perhaps throw in some pizza and beer.

Perl Workshop

The next step up from technical meetings is Perl workshops. Many Perl Mongers groups organise annual one-day workshops. There can be many talks taking place across a number of tracks over the course of (usually) a day. The organisers often like to make these events free (mainly, it seems, because charging for stuff like this adds a whole new layer of complexity). But it’s not free to put on these events so they rely heavily on sponsors. Can you help pay for the venue? Or the printing? Or the catering? Different events will have different opportunities available. Contact the organisers.

YAPC

Workshops are national and (usually) one-day events. YAPC are international conferences that span many days. They have all the same requirements, but bigger. So they need more money. And, of course, sponsors can be at the conference telling potential employees just how wonderful it is to work for them.

The Perl Foundation

The Perl Foundation are the organisation that promotes Perl, holds various Perl trademarks and hosts many Perl web sites. They issue grants for people to work on various Perl-related projects. They never have enough money. They love companies who donate money to them as thanks for the benefit that Perl brings. How much you donate is up to you, but as a guide, most announcements seem to be in the $10,000 range.

In each of these cases, the idea is really to show the Perl community how much you value Perl by helping various Perl organisations to organise events that raise people’s awareness of Perl. Everyone wins. The sponsors get seen as good people to work for and the events themselves demonstrate that modern Perl is still a great language.

So the next time someone in your company asks how they can find good Perl people, consider a different approach. Can you embed your company in the conciousness of the Perl community and make yourselves look more attractive to some of the best Perl programmers in the world?

A WordPress Critter

Perl News - Powered by WordPress
Perl News – Powered by WordPress

If you were at YAPC::Europe this week you might well have seen Richard Jelinek’s talk about how to increase Perl’s popularity (update: the slides are here). As part of that talk he suggested that the Perl community needed to run more of its infrastructure using Perl and (amongst other examples) he mentioned a discussion he had with an unnamed Perl News administrator about why Perl News is run using WordPress (which is written in PHP).

I’m happy to admit that I’m the unnamed Perl News administrator. But I think that Richard’s report of our conversation omits a lot of the detail in the points I tried to make to him. So I’d like to take the time to clarify my thoughts on this. There are three points in particular that I’d like to make.

1/ Multitasking

I have a lot of projects on the go. I should probably cut back a bit. Yes, I could start a project to create a WordPress clone in Perl, but that would mean that I would need to shelve a few other projects for some considerable time. The alternative is to quickly build Perl News using an existing tool. You know which option I chose. Of course, you’re free to disagree with me.

2/ Network Effects

Even if there was a capable WordPress replacement written in Perl I probably wouldn’t use it. You see, WordPress isn’t just the software. There’s also a huge community behind it. And that means that there are a huge number of themes and plugins available – with more being released all the time. Every time I want to add a feature to WordPress site, I just find the appropriate plugin and install it. Without that huge community, I would have to implement lots of stuff myself. Which would mean that either I’d be working on Perl News full-time or Perl News would be missing lots of features (for example the social networking hooks).

Don’t forget that I’m also involved in running blogs.perl.org. That runs on Movable Type (which is written in Perl). And have you seen the list of issues that we have with that site?

3/ Patches Welcome

Leo and I built Perl News because we thought it was a useful site for the Perl community to have. You can probably tell from the frequency of updates on the site that it’s not exactly a top priority for either of us. Personally, I’d be very happy if someone else took responsibility for it. So if you think that you can do better, or if you have a Perl system that you think could be used in place of WordPress without any removal of functionality, them please let us know. I’d be really happy to give you a dump of our database (so that you have all the existing stories) and update the DNS to point the domain at your server.

If it matters to you to have Perl web sites running on Perl code, then just go ahead and do it. I would be happy to see it happen. I just don’t have the time to do it myself.

Cultured Perl Blog

A couple of years ago I thought that one thing the Perl community was missing was a network of blog sites about Perl. I’m not talking about the individual blogs that are being shown off to such good effect by the Iron Man project, I’m talking about a set of multi-author blogs that covered particular facets of the Perl world. Something like a Perl-specific version of LifeHacker or BoingBoing. To that end, I registered a number of domains and set about installing Movable Type.

That bit was easy. That bit I can do. The next bit is harder.

The next bit involves getting authors interested in writing for the blogs on a regular basis. That bit I didn’t do so well at and none of the blogs florished.

One of them didn’t even get going. That was Cultured Perl. The idea behind Cultured Perl was that it would discuss Perl culture. That’s all the non-technical bits of the Perl world. Perl Mongers, Perl conferences, things like that. I had a few authors signed up, but nothing ever really happened.

So why am I telling you this? Well, the Cultured Perl domains are up for renewal. And I’m trying to work out whether it’s worth keeping them.

Would you be interested in reading a Cultured Perl blog? And would you be interested in writing for it?