Culling My Modules

About a year ago, I dabbled briefly with Travis CI. I even gave a talk about my experiences. The plan was that I would start to use it for all of my code. But real life intervened and I never got round to getting any further with that project.

This weekend, I finally made some progress. I added a .travis.yml file to all of my Github repositories that hold CPAN modules. I even fed the details through to Coveralls so I get test coverage reports. From there it was a simple step to building a dashboard that monitors the health of all of my CPAN modules.

And it’s not a pretty picture. You’ll see a lot of grey boxes on that page, indicating that Travis couldn’t run the tests or, worse, red boxes showing that the tests failed for some reason.

Yesterday I made a few quick fixes to some of the modules (particularly in the WWW::Shorten namespace) and a couple more of them now work. But I want to work out how much effort it’s worth investing in the ones that are still failing. And, widening my scope a little, I’ve decided to take a close look at my CPAN modules and work out which ones are worth keeping and which ones I should just delete.

For example, twelve years ago I was really excited about the idea of AudioFile::Info. Most people were ripping music to MP3s, but I wasn’t following the crowd and was using Ogg Vorbis instead. AudioFile::Info and its friends was an attempt to make it easy to extract information from audio files no matter which format they were it. I suppose it was a kind of DBI for ID3 tags. But twelve years on, does anyone really care about that any more? I switched all of my music collection to MP3 years ago. If I recall correctly, the AudioFile::Info modules use a convoluted hand-crafted plugin system which never worked as well as it should. I could probably switch them to use some kind of plugin architecture from CPAN. But is it worth the effort?

Then there is Guardian::OpenPlatform::API – a Perl wrapper around the Guardian’s API. I believe they changed the API end-point several years ago so the module doesn’t even work. But the fact that I’ve had no complaints about that, probably indicates that no-one has ever used it.

It’s a similar story for Net::Backpack. To be honest, I have no idea whether or not it still works. Is Backpack still running? Ok, I’ve just checked and they’re no longer offering it to new customers. But if I’m not a paying customer is there any way I can test that it still works?

Finally, there is the WWW::Shorten family of modules. I released a module called WWW::MakeAShorterLink back in 2002, but it was Iain Truskett who realised that there should be a family of modules around the (at the time new) URL-shortening industry. I took over the module when Iain passed away and I’ve been maintaining it ever since. But it’s a real pain to maintain. The URL-shortening industry changes really quickly. For a long time, new services were popping up all of the time (and many of them closed down just as quickly). I haven’t been anywhere near quick enough at releasing versions that keep up with all the changes. I suspect that at least a couple of the current test failures are down to services that have closed down. I should probably investigate those over the next few days.

I don’t think WWW::Shorten is in any danger of going away (but I need to find a better way to keep abreast of changes in the industry) but the other modules I’ve mentioned here (AudioFile::Info::*, Guardian::OpenPlatform::API and Net::Backpack) are on borrowed time. If you’re using them and you’d like to see new versions of them in the future then let me know. If you’d like to take over maintenance, then that would be even better.

If I don’t hear from anyone (and I strongly suspect that I won’t) then I’ll be removing them from CPAN in a couple of months time.

Perl School Slides

In 2012 and 2013 I ran an experiment called Perl School. I ran cheap Perl training on a Saturday at Google Campus. I got some great reactions but I stopped it after almost a year because it wasn’t getting the traction that I hoped for and attendances were starting to drop.

That’s not the end of Perl School though. I have a couple of ideas that I’m considering and it will return at some point (in some form).

But I thought that the courses were good. And I realised earlier today that I hadn’t made some of the slides public. So I uploaded them to Slideshare and they are embedded below.

Let me know if you find them interesting or useful.

Perl in Banks

An email has flooded in:

I came across your presentation ‘Perl in the Enterprise’ and happen to have a burning concern closely related to one of the bullets ‘Banks see as a competitive advantage’.

I am consulting at a major bank in South Africa, and our team have been using Perl very productively to develop and maintain a customer loyalty rewards  application. This application has now suddenly caught the attention of the ‘Architecture Board’ who are questioning whether Perl (or any other scripting language) is appropriate for production use. A presentation will have to be made to this board to present a business case.

Whatever the basis for this concern, some quotable and referencable stories from other banks, such as the list included in your clients on the website, would be gold for us. I have searched extensively on the web and cannot find anything in this light which is also recent, as in the last 5 years. Other than Nvidia and Booking.com I can only find anecdotal, 2nd hand evidence of Perl use for medium-to-large applications in well-known corporates.

Do you by any chance have anything or any contacts in those banks that would be willing to respond to an email to confirm their use of Perl and perhaps repeat the competitive advantage claim?

The presentation he’s talking about is Perl in the Enterprise, which I gave at Linux World Expo in 2005. The particular line he’s interested in is on slide 6 where I say that banks see using Perl as a competitive advantage. I’m pretty sure that I was paraphrasing Phillip Moore of Morgan Stanley who had said something similar in a keynote at OSCON in about 2001.

Obviously I know that banks in the City of London still use Perl. But it’s been several years since I worked at one, so my personal experience is slightly out of date. What my correspondent needs is people who are currently working in banks who are happy to go public and say “we use Perl in our production systems”. It would be even more helpful if they could add “and here’s why…”.

Can anyone out there help?