The Fragility of Contracting

I’ve been rather quiet for a few months. That’s because I’ve been working for a large investment bank in Canary Wharf. It’s no so much that the work takes up more of my time than other contracts I’ve had, but more that the incredibly restrictive firewalls banks have around their networks have meant that I have far less ability to keep in touch with things during the working day. I understand security is so important to them but, wow, it’s hard having to live with it.

Working in the finance sector is lucrative, but not much fun (which, I suppose, might explain why they make it so lucrative).

But all that is about to change. On Wednesday, the project leader told me that the bank were letting all of the contractors in the group go. It had come as a complete surprise to him too – he had just received an email telling him to let us know. That’s the way things work in the banking sector.

I’m not sure if it was a slow reaction to Brexit or an extremely quick reaction to Trump or something else completely. But we’ll all be leaving at the end of this month.

Which means that I’m looking for a new contract. So if you’re reading this and you know of a team who are looking for a contractor then please let me know and we might be able to work something out.

Because of way this was timed, I think I’ll probably be looking for something to start at the beginning of next year. I’m going to South Africa for a couple of weeks at the end of the year and it seems pretty pointless to do a couple of weeks at a new job before going away for a while and forgetting everything I’ve learned.

But it would be nice if I didn’t spend all of the first two weeks of December watching Netflix. So there are a few possibilities I’m considering:

  • Could I find magazines or web sites that would pay me to write articles for them?
  • Could I go into a company for a few days of consultancy (perhaps an architectural review or something like that)?
  • Could I do a code review for some of your companies codebase?

Or, the most likely option:

  • Do you have colleagues who could benefit from a few days Perl training? Have you been vaguely thinking “you, know it might be nice to get Dave in to run some in-house training”? If that’s the case, then the first couple of weeks of December would be a great time to get more serious about this.

In fact, if there’s any way that you think I could be of use to your company for a few days in December or on a longer-term basis from January, then please get in touch.

Google Currents

Google Currents is an application for viewing content on Android and iOS devices. It reformats content (based on web feeds) to look like a magazine. It looks great on my HTC One X and I’m expecting it to look even better on my Nexus 7 when it arrives.

It’s possible to subscribe to web feeds using it, but for some reason content looks better if the web site owner goes through a simple process to publish the content. This is literally a three minute job which you do from the Google Currents Producer web page. I’ve done that for both this site and the Perl News web site. I can’t seem to find any way to share the address of this content, but if you open the Currents app on your tablet or phone and search for “Perl Hacks” and “Perl News” you should be able to find them.

Currently I’m using all the default formatting options, but I suspect I’ll be drawn into tweaking things soon.

If you published Perl-related content on the web (or, indeed, any other kind of content) then it might well be worth your while taking the three minutes it takes to publish your content for Google Current.

Yet More Modern Perl in Linux Format

Over the weekend the postman bought me my subscribption copy of Linux Format issue 155. This contains the third (and final) part of my Modern Perl tutorial. In this part we’re adding features to the Dancer web application that we started in issue 153.

This series has concentrated on web applications (with Dancer) and database access (with DBIx::Class). I’ve already got provisional agreement for another short series later in the year – where I plan to cover OO programming using Moose.

The new issue will be in the shops later this week.

More Modern Perl in Linux Format

Yesterday’s post bought my subscription copy of Linux Format issue 153. This issue contains the second article in my short series about Modern Perl. In this article we take the simple DBIx::Class application that we wrote last time and put a web front end on it using Dancer.

Over the next few days I’ll be writing the third (and final) article in the series. This will involve adding more features to the web app.

If the series is successful (and please let LXF know if you liked it) then perhaps I’ll be asked back to write more next year.

LXF 153 should be appearing in all good newsagents next week.

Doomed Domains

Summer is YAPC time. And YAPC means getting inspired on Perl-related projects. And that, obviously, means buying domain names for those projects. And that, inevitably, leads to lots of email from domain registries at about this time of year which roughly translate to “are you ever going to do anything useful with that domain you bought a couple of years ago, or should you just face facts and let it go?”

This year’s batch brings memories of projects from the last three years.

In Copenhagen in 2008 I gave a talk called Proud to Use Perl. To back it up I started a blog where I planned to share things that made me proud to use Perl. It didn’t last long. Even when I brought a team to help me, no-one had the time and nothing has been written there for two years. An advocacy site like that does more harm than good unless it it kept updated. So unless someone wants to take over the site (and keep it up to date) I’m going to let the domain lapse.

Lisbon in 2009 seemed to be largely about getting the Perl marketing project up and running. It was the scene of the famous Perl Marketing BOF. One of the ideas that came out of it was that Perl needed better web sites. I registered perlfive.com and perlfive.org in order to… well… I’m not really sure what they were for. Currently they both just redirect to perl.org. Do you have a better use for them?

And then last year in Pisa we had Perl Vogue. I was learning by that point and only registered the domain for a year. I’d really love for the Perl Vogue idea to really take off, but I’m not going to be the one to do it. If you want to try, then let me know.

Most of these domains expire some time in July. If you have ideas of what we can do with them then please get in touch. But, be aware that any suggestions that start “couldn’t you just…” are likely to be ignored. I’m looking for suggestions that start “I’d like too…”.