Perl Monks Passwords

It seems that the Perl Monks database has been compromised through some kind of security hole on the server that hosts it. That would, of course, be bad enough. But it seems that the user passwords in that database were stored in plain text. So whoever got the database, got access to the passwords of every user. Some of those passwords (those belonging to the saints and the janitors) have been shared publically. And changing your password might not help as the original vulnerability hasn’t been plugged yet so the same people could grab any password that you change it to.

More details will probably appear on Perl Monks once they’ve worked out what they are going to say. But there is some discussion starting up here.

I’m astonished that I still have to repeat this, but please take this advice:

  • If you’re running a site, do not store passwords in plain text
  • If you’re using a site, do not use the same password as you use on other sites

Marketing Perl

People seem to be coming round to the idea that Perl needs better marketing. Both Ovid and Gabor have written some interesting blog posts recently.

I’m glad to see this idea getting traction. It’s something that I mentioned in 2006. So whilst people are talking about it, let’s see if we can get something done. A large number of Perl programmers will be getting together in Lisbon next week, so I’m trying to arrange a session where we can talk this through and make some kind of plan. If you’re interested in marketing Perl and you’ll be in Lisbon, then please sign up and and come along.

White Camels 2009

At OSCON last night the winners of this year’s White Camel awards were announced. Unless you were involved in the discussions to choose the winners or were at OSCON, you won’t have known that as there has been no announcement on any of the usual Perl news sites. And TPF wonder why people complain that they don’t communicate :-)

Oh, I’m wrong. There’s an obscure page deep within perl.org. You knew to look there, right?

Anyway, the White Camel winners for this year are Tim Bunce, Michael Schwern and Philippe (BooK) Bruhat. Three extremely deserving winners, all of whom have done a lot of useful work for the Perl community.

Congratulations to them all.

Forthcoming London.pm Meetings

Here’s some advance notice of a couple of london.pm meetings.

The next social meeting will be on Thursday June 4th at the Gunmakers. Social meetings are a chance for people to get together over a drink and talk about whatever takes their fancy (sometimes, that even includes Perl). There’s also a tradition that the leader of the group will buy a drink for any people coming along for the first time. So when you get there, look for Léon.

Then on Wednesday 10th, london.pm (along with a few other, less important, language user groups) are organising a Dynamic Languages evening where users of many dynamic languages will give lightning talks about various interesting topics. The meeting is hosted by the British computer Society, and I’m hearing reports that the sign-up process is a bit of an intellectual challenge – but please persevere and come along to the meeting.