Daily Archives: 16 March, 2012

“You Must Hate Version Control Systems”

I’ve been an independent consultant for a long time now. Over the last seventeen years I’ve worked for dozens of different clients. In that time it’s been interesting to watch how good practices have slowly permeated the industry. These days, when I start working with a new client there’s about a 50% chance that they will have some kind of Continuous Integration environment in place. Over the next couple of years that percentage will, no doubt, increase and CI will just become part of the standard software development toolkit. Those of you thinking “but it’s already part of the standard software development toolkit” should realise that not everyone is as leading edge as you are.

For example, before CI was on the scene, unit testing was the big new idea. Over the last ten years, the percentage of clients where I seen unit tests being used has gone from about 10% to pretty much 100%. For most software developers, the idea that you would develop any large project without unit tests seems ridiculous. But it wasn’t always like that.

Before that, it was source code control. When I first started out in my career I had a number of clients where I spent a lot of time persuading people of the benefits of source code control. At one large bank in the City of London I was charged with getting all of the development teams in one department to use source code control. It was probably SCCS or RCS – either of which is just barely better than nothing. One of the development team leaders was particularly hard to persuade. At one point he told me:

I understand exactly what source code control is for. But it solves a problem that my team just doesn’t have.

I didn’t really understand that. He had a team of three people. They all worked on the same codebase. How was it possible that source code control wouldn’t make their lives easier? Later I worked more closely with that team and came to understand their working techniques as I found a directory of tarballs with datestamps in their names[1].

Of course, this is all ancient history now. In these enlightened times we can laugh at stories like this because we all know how important source code control is.

But look at this job¬†description¬†which was posted on jobs.perl.org a couple of weeks ago. There are a number of things in this advert which worry me – “raw perl (no modules)” – but I think the thing that scared me most was where it says:

You must hate version control systems, we won’t be using any.

I’m not sure what’s the most surprising thing here – the fact that there are people who still think like this or the fact that they admit it in a job advert as they think it will encourage people to apply for their job.

All in all I don’t think that Holophrastic Enterprises[2] sounds like the kind of place that I’d like to work. You might disagree. You might think that cutting through all this “best practices” nonsense and just getting on with coding sounds like your perfect job.

If you apply, please let us know how you get on.

Me, I’ll be sticking with version control.

[1] It can’t be coincidence that this was also the team leader who complained the most when the infrastucture and deployment team I worked in took the decision to remove developer access to the production servers.

[2] And if anyone can tell me why they need all that Javascript on their single static page web site, I’d love to hear it.